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I have data like this:

ID    ATTRIBUTE        START          END
 1            A   01-01-2000   15-03-2010
 1            B   05-11-2001   06-02-2002
 2            B   01-02-2002   08-05-2008
 2            B   01-06-2008   01-07-2008

I now want to count the number of different IDs having a certain attribute per year.

A result could look like this:

YEAR    count(A)    count(B)
2000          1           0
2001          1           1
2002          1           2
2003          1           1
2004          1           1
2005          1           1
2006          1           1
2007          1           1
2008          1           1
2009          1           0
2010          1           0

I the second step of counting the occurences is probably easy.

But how would I split my data into years?

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
    
You mean the attribute (A and B) count per year between START and END? –  daroczig Oct 24 '11 at 9:16
    
yes, almost. I mean the attribute count (A and B) per year from start to end and without double counting IDs (like the last two lines of my input example) –  speendo Oct 24 '11 at 9:31
    
What have you tried so far? You can create a sequence of years for each row and assign the ATTRIBUTE to each year. When you do that for every row of your data, you just count the number of years with your ATTRIBUTE. I'm sure @daroczig has a full blown answer with code on his way. :) –  Roman Luštrik Oct 24 '11 at 9:45
    
I'm currently trying to split my data so that I have a data frame for every year containing only episodes that were active in the current year. However this is very sophisticated and needs a lot of code. I hope there is an easier way –  speendo Oct 24 '11 at 9:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here is an approach using a few of Hadley's packages.

library(lubridate); library(reshape2); library(plyr)

# extract years from start and end dates after converting them to date
dfr2 = transform(dfr, START = year(dmy(START)), END = year(dmy(END)))

# for every row, construct a sequence of years from start to end
dfr2 = adply(dfr2, 1, transform, YEAR = START:END)

# create pivot table of year vs. attribute with number of unique values of ID
dcast(dfr2, YEAR ~ ATTRIBUTE, function(x) length(unique(x)), value_var = 'ID')

EDIT: If the original data.frame is large, then adply might take a lot of time. A useful alternate in such cases is to use the data.table package. Here is how we can replace the adply call using data.table.

require(data.table)
dfr2 = data.table(dfr2)[,list(YEAR = START:END),'ID, ATTRIBUTE']
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that is a neat (+) one :) –  daroczig Oct 24 '11 at 12:36
    
wow, that's cool. Now I get a table with START:END; Attribute1; Attribute2. How would I get it with just one year? –  speendo Oct 24 '11 at 14:49
2  
Did you take a look at the output of the dcast statement? it follows the same format that you described in your question. if this is not the output you wanted, please edit your question to reflect the output format. –  Ramnath Oct 24 '11 at 14:55
    
hm, I modified it a bit, as adply took ages. I look at it again –  speendo Oct 24 '11 at 15:05
3  
Please don't spread this awful idea of using = instead of <-. –  mbq Oct 24 '11 at 20:02

Here is a solution that only uses the core of R. First we show the input data to keep this all self contained:

DF <- data.frame(ID = c(1, 1, 2, 2), 
    ATTRIBUTE = c("A", "B", "B", "B"), 
    START = c("01-01-2000", "05-11-2001", "01-02-2002", "01-06-2008"), 
    END = c("15-03-2010", "06-02-2002", "08-05-2008", "01-07-2008"))

Now that we have the input the solution follows: yr is defined to be a function which extracts the year. The guts of the calculation is the statement following the definition of yr. For each row of DF the anonymous function produces a data frame having the years spanned in column 1 and the ATTRIBUTE and ID in columns 2 and 3. For example, the data frame corresponding to the first row of DF is the 11 row data.frame(YEAR = 2000:2010, ATTRIBUTE = 1, ID = "A") and the data frame corresponding to the second row of DF is the two row data.frame(YEAR = 2001:2002, ATTRIBUTE = 1, ID = "B"). The lapply produces a list of such data frames, one for each row of DF so in the example input above it produces a list with 4 components. Using do.call we rbind the components of that list, i.e. the individuals data frames, producing a single large data frame. We eliminate duplicate rows (using unique) from this large data frame, drop the ID column (the third column) and run table on the result:

yr <- function(d) as.numeric(sub(".*-", "", d))
out <- table(unique(do.call(rbind, lapply(1:nrow(DF), function(r) with(DF[r, ],
    data.frame(YEAR = seq(yr(START), yr(END)), ATTRIBUTE, ID)))))[, -3])

The resulting table is:

> out
      ATTRIBUTE
YEAR   A B
  2000 1 0
  2001 1 1
  2002 1 2
  2003 1 1
  2004 1 1
  2005 1 1
  2006 1 1
  2007 1 1
  2008 1 1
  2009 1 0
  2010 1 0

EDIT:

Poster has later indicated that memory might be a problem so here is an sqldf solution which processes the key large intermediate results in sqlite outside of R (the dbname = tempfile() tells it to do that) so any memory limitation of R will not affect it. It uses the same input and the same yr function shown above and returns the same result, tab is the same asout above. Also try it without the dbname = tempfile() in case it actually does fit in memory.

library(sqldf)

DF2 <- transform(DF, START = yr(START), END = yr(END))
years <- data.frame(year = min(DF2$START):max(DF2$END))

tab.df <- sqldf("select year, ATTRIBUTE, count(*) as count from
    (select distinct year, ATTRIBUTE, ID
    from years, DF2
    where year between START and END)
    group by year, ATTRIBUTE", dbname = tempfile())

tab <- xtabs(count ~., tab.df)
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is a neater one-liner (+1) compared to mine :) –  daroczig Oct 25 '11 at 8:17

Slighty convoluted, but try this:

dfr <- data.frame(ID=c(1,1,2,2),ATTRIBUTE=c("A","B","B","B"),START=c("01-01-2000","05-11-2001","01-02-2002","01-06-2008"),END=c("15-03-2010","06-02-2002","08-05-2008","01-07-2008"),stringsAsFactors=F)
dfr$ATTRIBUTE <- factor(dfr$ATTRIBUTE)

actYears <- mapply(":",as.numeric(substr(dfr$START,7,10)),as.numeric(substr(dfr$END,7,10)))

yrRng <- ":"(range(actYears)[1],range(actYears)[2])

yrTable <- sapply(actYears,function(x) yrRng %in% x)
rownames(yrTable) <- yrRange
colnames(yrTable) <- dfr$ATTRIBUTE

Which gives:

yrTable
        A     B     B     B
2000 TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
2001 TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
2002 TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
2003 TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
2004 TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
2005 TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
2006 TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
2007 TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
2008 TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
2009 TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
2010 TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE

Now we can build the table:

t(apply(yrTable,1,function(x) table(dfr$ATTRIBUTE[x])))
     A B
2000 1 0
2001 1 1
2002 1 2
2003 1 1
2004 1 1
2005 1 1
2006 1 1
2007 1 1
2008 1 2
2009 1 0
2010 1 0

Its still double counting the IDs, but it would probably be easier to merge overlapping ranges in the original data.frame.

share|improve this answer
    
nice! but this solution blows my memory limits (it's about a real big project) –  speendo Oct 24 '11 at 12:41

I did not intend to give an answer here as the problem seemed a bit tricky, so I could have made up only an ugly solution, but after reading @Roman Luštrik's comment I could not escape this challenge :)

Anyway, I am not sure if you will like this solution, so be prepared!

Loading your demo data:

dfr <- structure(list(ID = c(1, 1, 2, 2), ATTRIBUTE = structure(c(1L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("A", "B"), class = "factor"), START = c("01-01-2000", "05-11-2001", "01-02-2002", "01-06-2008"), END = c("15-03-2010", "06-02-2002", "08-05-2008", "01-07-2008")), .Names = c("ID", "ATTRIBUTE", "START", "END"), row.names = c(NA, -4L), class = "data.frame")

We are not dealing with months and so, just keeping the year in the table:

> dfr$START <- as.numeric(substr(dfr$START, 7, 10))
> dfr$END <- as.numeric(substr(dfr$END, 7, 10))
> dfr
  ID ATTRIBUTE START  END
1  1         A  2000 2010
2  1         B  2001 2002
3  2         B  2002 2008
4  2         B  2008 2008

Clear out duplicated rows (by merging years based on ID and ATTRIBUTE):

> dfr <- merge(aggregate(START ~ ID + ATTRIBUTE, dfr, min), aggregate(END ~ ID + ATTRIBUTE, dfr, max), by=c('ID', 'ATTRIBUTE'))
> dfr
  ID ATTRIBUTE START  END
1  1         A  2000 2010
2  1         B  2001 2002
3  2         B  2002 2008

And run a one-liner with some apply, lapply, do.call and friends to show the beauty of R! :)

> t(table(do.call(rbind, lapply(apply(dfr, 1, function(x) cbind(x[2], x[3]:x[4])), function(x) as.data.frame(x)))))
      V1
V2     A B
  2000 1 0
  2001 1 1
  2002 1 2
  2003 1 1
  2004 1 1
  2005 1 1
  2006 1 1
  2007 1 1
  2008 1 1
  2009 1 0
  2010 1 0
share|improve this answer
    
nice solution! but using min and max to aggregate would fail if the ranges are non-overlapping. example 2002 - 2008 and 1997 - 1999. your aggregation function would interpret it as 1997 - 2008 which is not quite right. –  Ramnath Oct 24 '11 at 12:30
    
@Ramnath is absolutely right, I did not thought about that one. And I know that using substr for extracting the year from the date is also an ugly hack, this should be rather done by using date or so, eg.: format(as.Date(dfr$START, '%m-%d-%Y'), '%Y') –  daroczig Oct 24 '11 at 12:34

Thanks for all your answers!

All of them are really neat, but some drive my computer to it's limits, because I have to handle really big amounts of data.

I finally looked at all of your solutions and constructed a slightly different one:

data <- structure(list(ID = c(1, 1, 2, 2), ATTRIBUTE = structure(c(1L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("A", "B"), class = "factor"), START = c("2000-01-01", "2001-11-05", "2002-02-01", "2008-06-01"), END = c("2010-03-15", "2002-02-06", "2008-05-08", "2008-07-01")), .Names = c("ID", "ATTRIBUTE", "START", "END"), row.names = c(NA, -4L), class = "data.frame")

data$START <- as.Date(data$START)
data$END <- as.Date(data$END)
data$y0 <- (format(data$START,"%Y"))
data$y1 <- (format(data$END,"%Y"))

attributeTable <- function(dfr) {
  years <- data.frame(row.names(seq(min(dfr$y0), max(dfr$y1))))

  for (i in min(dfr$y0):max(dfr$y1)) {
    years[paste(i), "A"] <- length(unique(dfr$ID[dfr$y0 <= i & dfr$y1 >= i & dfr$ATTRIBUTE == "A"]))
    years[paste(i), "B"] <- length(unique(dfr$ID[dfr$y0 <= i & dfr$y1 >= i & dfr$ATTRIBUTE == "B"]))
  }

  years
}

attributeTable(data)

The drawback is, I have to define each possible shape of the attribute. Maybe there is a way to do this automatically, but I haven't found it yet.

The speed of this solution is at least quite acceptable.

share|improve this answer
1  
In response to your comment that you have large input, I have added an sqldf solution to my answer which has minimal memory requirements from R. –  G. Grothendieck Oct 25 '11 at 20:42

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