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If no user-defined destructor exists for a class and one is needed, the compiler implicitly declare a destructor. When I need to declare my own destructor?

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There is no "and one is needed" condition: a class always has a destructor. –  Karl Knechtel Oct 24 '11 at 8:45
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But not always a user-defined destructor. –  GolezTrol Oct 24 '11 at 8:46
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See here. –  Björn Pollex Oct 24 '11 at 8:46
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When the implicitly declared destructor won't do what you need it to.

This is somewhat involved. You should look up and research the rule of three.

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Rather than posting a link to Google, you should post a link to this excellent SO-question covering the topic in great detail. –  Björn Pollex Oct 24 '11 at 8:48
    
It's #4 in the search results when I do it. :) –  Karl Knechtel Oct 24 '11 at 8:49
    
Also, a topic not covered in there is that you need to declare an empty virtual destructor if you want a polymorphic class. –  Björn Pollex Oct 24 '11 at 8:50
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I agree about the rule of three in general, but it's worth mentioning that a lot of cases where one would have provided a user defined destructor and assignment operator in the past are eliminated by an intelligent use of RAII classes as members. –  James Kanze Oct 24 '11 at 9:12
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@James: I think one can even say, as a design principle, "all cases" rather than just "a lot of cases". That is, only RAII classes should have destructors, and a RAII class should manage the lifetime of exactly one resource and do nothing else. –  Steve Jessop Oct 24 '11 at 9:46
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If you allocate memory, create objects, or anything else you do, either in the constructor or afterwards, that needs to be cleaned up when your object is destructed.

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When you want to ensure something is finished. The 'something' would usually be closing a network connection or file or freeing up some memory etc...

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Each time you must execute special tasks on object destruction, i.e: memory deallocation, close network connections, decrement count references, threads synchronization, throw stored exceptions, etc.

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"throw stored exceptions" - a warning though, throwing from a destructor isn't something you want to do lightly! It's pretty difficult to avoid situations where your program will terminate without telling you anything useful, although there are limited cases where it's possible. –  Steve Jessop Oct 24 '11 at 9:48
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