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From Wikipedia:

// The Curiously Recurring Template Pattern (CRTP)
template <typename T>
struct base
{
    // ...
};
struct derived : base<derived>
{
    // ...
};

Now if I want derived_from_derived, I can write:

// The Curiously Recurring Template Pattern (CRTP)
template <typename T>
struct base
{
    // ...
};
template <typename T>
struct derived : base<T>
{
    // ...
};
struct derived_from_derived : derived <derived_from_derived>
{
    // ...
};

Now suppose I just want a derived object. This doesn't work:

derived<derived> obj;

Does derived have to be abstract, or is there a way to instantiate it?

share|improve this question
    
Wikipedia attribution rules require a link, I believe. Please link to the article you quote. –  Mat Oct 24 '11 at 10:07
    
@Mat: short quote = fair use :) –  paperjam Oct 24 '11 at 10:11

5 Answers 5

Support for deeper inheritance hierarchies with CRTP usually is implemented by "inserting" CRTP classes between your own classes in the inheritance hierarchy:


struct empty
{};

template <class Derived, class Base = empty>
struct crtp_services : Base
{};

class base : public crtp_services<base>
{};

class derived : public crtp_services<derived, base>
{};

class derived_of_derived : public crtp_services<derived_of_derived, derived>
{};

share|improve this answer
    
There is a problem here. How can a function in base get a pointer to the concrete class derived or derived_of_derived? –  paperjam Oct 24 '11 at 11:29
    
@paperjam: could you please add an example of what you need to your question? right now I can only say that you'd have to factor out code which works with specific derived classes to crtp_services, that's what it is needed for. –  Konstantin Oznobihin Oct 24 '11 at 11:34
    
Support I have function base::go() { static_cast<Derived*>(this)->go2(); }. If I call derived_of_derived::go() I will arrive at derived::go2() and not derived_of_derived::go2(). Hope that makes sense! –  paperjam Oct 24 '11 at 11:53
    
@paperjam: then you need to move 'go' to the crtp_serivces class: 'crtp_services::go() { static_cast<Derived*>(this)->go2(); }', derived_of_derived::go will be inherited from crtp_services for derived_of_derived and will result in derived_of_derived::go2. –  Konstantin Oznobihin Oct 24 '11 at 12:02
    
I don't think that works. You have multiple crtp_services in your UML inheritance graph and base only sees the one above it. –  paperjam Oct 24 '11 at 12:08
up vote 2 down vote accepted

My own answer is this:

struct base
{
    template <typename T>
    struct type
    {
        // ...
    };
};
struct derived
{
    template <typename T=derived>
    struct type : base::type<T>
    {
        // ...
    };
}
struct derived_from_derived 
{
    template <typename T=derived_from_derived >
    struct type : derived::type<T>
    {
        // ...
    };
};

Now I can have a derived::type<> obj. Also, parametized inheritance works (e.g. decorator pattern):

template <typename whatever>
struct derived_from_whatever 
{
    template <typename T=derived_from_whatever>
    struct type : whatever::type<T>
    {
        // ...
    };
};

derived_from_whatever<derived_from_derived>::type<> obj_whatever;
share|improve this answer

It's not legal to do that, since the inner derived is not a class, but is itself a template, and not a legal argument for the derived template.

The way that this is usually done is to have a set of derived templates implementations, and then each implementation has a separate class which is used to instantiate that implementation as a concrete class.

template <typename T>
struct base
{

};


template <typename T>
struct derived_impl : base<T>
{


};


struct derived : derived_impl<derived>
{


};


template <typename T>
struct derived_of_derived_impl: derived_impl<T>
{


};

struct derived_of_derived : derived_of_derived_impl<derived_of_derived>
{

};
share|improve this answer
derived<derived> obj;

is not allowed because derived is a template class and the inner derived is not yet complete. It needs to have a type like derived<int>.

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There's no such thing as "just" a derived object, just like you cannot have "just" std::vector, nor can you have float x = sqrt();. The type requires an argument, and you must provide it.

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