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I have 2 independent classes A and B and I have a Storage class which manages the storage of objects of type A and B.

I am trying to abstract the code that does the Store of A and B, however I am stuck due to List covariance I could not assign List<object> objList = new List<A>(); in the following code.

 [DataContract]
public class A {
    public int UID;
}

[DataContract]
public class B {
    public int UID;
}

public class Storage {

    public void Store(A a) {
        List<A> aList = ReadA();
        if (aList == null) {
            aList = new List<A>();
        }
        aList.Add(a);
        WriteNodes(aList);
    }

    public void StoreB(B b) {
        List<B> bList = ReadB();
        if (bList == null) {
            bList = new List<B>();
        }
        bList.Add(b);
        WriteNodes(bList);
    }

    public List<A> ReadA() {
        //deserializes from aFileName and returns List<A>
    }

    public List<B> ReadB() {
        //deserializes from bFileName adn returns List<B>
    }

    private static void WriteNodes<T>(List<T> nodeList) {
        FileStream fs = new FileStream(aFileName, FileMode.Create);
        XmlDictionaryWriter writer = XmlDictionaryWriter.CreateTextWriter(fs);
        DataContractSerializer ser =
            new DataContractSerializer(typeof(List<T>));
        ser.WriteObject(writer, nodeList);
        writer.Close();
        fs.Close();
    }
}

If you look at StoreA and StoreB methods they have a generic pattern except for the type that is used. ReadA and ReadB are no problem I could just take the type as another parameter and create a single function Read.

So is it possible to create an abstraction for Store so I don't end up with StoreA and StoreB methods?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do it by introducing common interface for items to be sotred and extract item type into enum.

STORAGE

public class Storage 
{       
   public Storage()
   {
     // create it once on construction stage
     // so you do not need to check for null each time in Sore()/Read()
     this.AllItems = new List<IItem>();
   }

   public IList<IItem> AllItems { get; private set; }

   public void Store<TItem>(TItem item)  
      where TItem: IItem
   {          
       this.AllItems.Add(item);
   }

   public IEnumerable<IItem> Read(StorageItemType itemType)
   {
      return this.AllItems.Where(item => item.ItemType == itemType);
   }
}

Abstract Storage Item type (more generic solution):

// Item types
enum StorageItemType
{
  A,
  B
}

interface IItem
{
   int UID { get; }
   StorageItemType ItemType { get; }
}

public abstract class StorageItemBase: IItem
{
  public int UID { get; private set; }

  public abstract StorageItemType ItemType 
}

public sealed class B : StorageItemBase    
{
  public override StorageItemType ItemType 
  { 
    get 
    {
       return StorageItemType.B; // !!!
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@sII, but storage happens to a file and I deserialize from a file (i.e I store objects of type A in one file and objects of type B in another file). Your solution seems to have the objects in memory. So to store to the right file, I need to have a map of the object type to the file name A->FileA; B->FileB and in the Store<T>() method, retrieve the file name before actually storing. – Santhosh Oct 24 '11 at 10:56
    
This is not a problem, just map usign IDictionary<StoreItemType, string> like <StoreItemType.A, "fileA.xml">, <StoreItemType.B, "fileB.xml"> and then usign IDictionary.ContainsKey resolve file name - if(dictionary.Containskey(StoreItemType.A)) { fileName = dictionary[StoreItemType.A]; } – sll Oct 24 '11 at 10:58
    
okay; got it; But is it a standard pattern to explicitly store the type of the object (in this case StorageItemType) as part of the actual object itself? How different is this from typeof()? Won't typeof give much the same information that StorageItemType gives? – Santhosh Oct 24 '11 at 11:03
    
StorageItemType is a business item type, not a OBJECT type whcih returned by object.GetType() so this is pretty normal technique to encapsulates some set of types by enum – sll Oct 24 '11 at 11:12

What about:

public void Store<T>(T a) {
        List<T> aList = Read<T>();
        if (aList == null) {
            aList = new List<T>();
        }
        aList.Add(a);
        WriteNodes(aList);
    }

public List<T> Read<T>() {
 //Read a or b depend on T
}
share|improve this answer

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