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I'm really struggling with regular expressions. I have to give English descriptions of the following regular expressions can anyone please please please help me..

  • i. a(aa)*
  • ii. a(b*ab*ab*)*
  • iii. b(b*ab*ab*)*

heres my attempts but everyone else in the class has seems to have shorter answers.

  • i. Find a "a" followed by either zero or more times "aa"s should be seen
  • ii. Find a "a" followed by either zero or more times of this pattern : (zero or more times "b" followed by zero or more times "ab" followed by zero or more times "ab")
  • iii. Find a "b" followed by either zero or more times of this pattern : (zero or more times "b" followed by zero or more times "ab" followed by zero or more times "ab")
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Are you looking for one regex to match all three of those rules, or do you want three different ones? –  Frost Oct 24 '11 at 11:31
    
three different –  user1010699 Oct 24 '11 at 11:32
    
yes they are actual regexes that need to be translated into english –  user1010699 Oct 24 '11 at 11:38

4 Answers 4

If those strings are actual regexes, they (completely) match the following:

  1. An odd number of as.
  2. A string starting with a, followed by any combination of as and bs, with an overall odd number of as.
  3. A string starting with b, followed by any combination of as and bs, with an overall even number of as. Edge case: If the string contains more than one b, it needs to contain at least two as.

"Any combination" includes zero instances of each character.

Some possible matches for 1.:

a
aaa
aaaaaa
aaaaaaaa etc.

Some possible matches for 2.:

a
aaa
ababa
aaab
abbbbbbbbaa
ababababababa

Some possible matches for 3.:

b
baa
baba
baaaaaba
bbbbbbbbbbaa
bababababbbbb
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Any comment from the downvoter? Is there an error in my explanation? –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 11:45
    
2. and 3. Not any combination of as and bs! Only single as combined with any number of bs with an overall odd number of as. –  Fischermaen Oct 24 '11 at 11:46
    
@Fischermaen: No. Read the regexes again (and test them if you don't believe me). a(b*ab*ab*)* matches abbbabababababababbbbbbbbaaaaaaaaaaba. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 11:48
    
@FailedDev: It depends whether you allow submatches or complete matches. I'm working from the assumption that complete matches are required. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 11:50
1  
@TimPietzcker No it's perfectly fine. This is the straightforward explanation anyone would give. –  FailedDev Oct 24 '11 at 11:52

Let me hint you a bit:

  • How would you describe the regular expression 'a'? How about 'aa'?. Ok, now, how would you describe the expression 'a*' and '(aa)*' ? For the latter there is a pattern which is interesting. Now, try to combine them. What is a(aa)* ? If you write down a couple of specimens for the regular language, there is a pattern you can spot.

  • Odd and even plays a role here.

The trick is to cut up the regular expression and understand each part. Then write down a couple of strings which are in the language the RE decides. Then look for a pattern. My guess is that this is what your TA/Prof wants you to do in order to understand the relationsship between an RE and the language it decides.

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i - an odd number of a's, with at least one a. ii - an odd number of a's, with at least one a, and 0 or more b's between each pair of a's.

Your attempted solutions seem correct, but I would expect your professor will complain that you're description is rephrasing the RE and is not an English description of the result.

I'll leave iii back to you to re-word (mainly because it's more difficult than the other two and I'm lazy this morning!)

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The rules are more complicated than that. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 11:37
    
@Tim Pietzcker -- please explain how - I don't see how your answers are different than mine. –  mah Oct 24 '11 at 13:13
    
ii needs to start with a. And the "0 or more b's" are not only possible between each pair of a's but anywhere in the string (except of course the beginning). –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 14:01
    
Thanks for the follow-up. I agree that I failed to state it must start with an a. The part about where b's are -- you disagree that each pair of a's has 0 or more b's between them because they can appear elsewhere? You might notice that there is no elsewhere in this string... only a's and b's. –  mah Oct 24 '11 at 15:12
    
Uh, OK, I probably read too much into that word "pair", thinking you meant the pairs of as in each group. Sorry. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 15:56

i. An odd number of as. ii. A string starting with a, followed by any combination of single as and multiple bs (zero or more), with an overall odd number of as. iii. A string starting with b, followed by any combination of single as and multiple bs (zero or more), with an overall even number of as

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Not single as. The bs inside the repeated group are completely optional. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '11 at 11:53

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