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I have a simple table but a long one (few millions or rows). The table contains many paired rows which I need to delete. The row data is not distinct! There are single rows (which has no a paired row) The table pairs are defined by cross info in two columns concatenated to a 3rd column. I would like to have only one row of each data identifier. Therefore, I need the myTable to shrink immediately whereis a condition is met. I tried:

myIndexColumn = Column1 + Column2 + Column3
myReversedIndexColumn = Column2 + Column1 + Column3

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX myIndex1 ON myDB.dbo.myTable (
  myIndexColumn ASC
)
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX myIndex2 ON myDB.dbo.myTable (
  myReversedIndexColumn ASC
)

DELETE FROM myDB.dbo.myTable
WHERE myIndexColumn in (SELECT myReversedIndex FROM myDB.dbo.myTable)

The problem is that both paired data is deleted instead of leaving one row of the data.

Obviously, that is because the DELETE commits changes only after running the entire transaction.

If I could persuid the MS SQL 2008 R2 Express edition to commit the DELETE upon condition is met, the SELECT clause would have output a shorter list on each row test to delete.

How do I do that?

share|improve this question
    
From what I can see, only those rows where myReversedIndexColumn = myIndexColumn should be deleted, This is where Column1 = Column2. Are you saying all paired rows are deleted –  gbn Oct 24 '11 at 11:55
    
I've just doubled check, it is deleting all paired data (most of the table). It happens because it is enough that a row with the specific reversed index exsists in order to delete a row. What I'm tring to do is to have an updated (on action - row by row) list to choose from in order to decide on a succesful delete. While the general case is that the indexes are different in each row, there are handful of rows in which the indexes are equal (0.006%). –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 12:39
    
So, you want to remove the 0.006 case? –  gbn Oct 24 '11 at 12:41
    
No, I need these rows. I would like to delete only ~half of the data. only the second of each paired rows. –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 12:44
    
It is about removing semi duplicates. Forget about the column1=column2, I have control over that. A duplicate is defined as if there are two rows in which row1.column3=row2.column3 and row1.column1=row2.column2 and row2.column1=row1.column2 . How to remove dups in this case? –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 13:42

1 Answer 1

To not delete the cases where column1 = column2

DELETE FROM myDB.dbo.myTable
WHERE myIndexColumn in (SELECT myReversedIndex FROM myDB.dbo.myTable)
  AND column1 <> column2

To remove column1 = column2

;with cte as
(
    select *,
        row_number() over (
                partition by Column1 + Column2 + Column3
                order by (SELECT 1)
                ) rn
    from yourtable
    where column1 = column2
)
delete cte where rn > 1

The CTE can be used to delete all duplicates too

;with cte as
(
    select *,
        row_number() over (
                partition by 
                      CASE WHEN Column1 > Column2 THEN Column2 ELSE Column1 END + 
                      CASE WHEN Column1 > Column2 THEN Column1 ELSE Column2 END + 
                      Column3
                order by (SELECT 1)
                ) rn
    from yourtable
)
delete cte where rn > 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I can't find any of the above useful. Yes, it is about removing semi duplicates. Forget about the column1=column2, I have control over that. A duplicate is defined as if there are two rows in which row1.column3=row2.column3 and row1.column1=row2.column2 and row2.column1=row1.column2 . about your dup remove I still try to run it with no luck. –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 13:40
    
Give examples then. –  gbn Oct 24 '11 at 13:45
    
Column1 and Column2 contain the names of children in a class in two succeeding years. Both lists contain almost the same data (one for year1 the other for year2), because the same kids are in the class (some new some dropped). Column1=column2 only if a kid do his classwork alone, and this is totally rare and not important (classes hold even number of kids by default, but some get sick or on personal vacation from time to time). –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 13:52
    
All kids do each task with all (most) separately of the other kids in different occasions. (I do not mind the learning curve, sometimes it is about matches) Each row represents achievements (column4) and more personal data (columns 5-8 for kid column1, and columns 9-12 for kid from column2) of the pair is a specific task (column3) –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 13:52
    
column1 + column2 doing task column3 is the same pair as column2 + column1 doing task column3 then the data in column4 is the same, therefor is redundant, and one of the rows should be removed, but not the other. It is that simple, and this is exactly what I need. –  elarrow Oct 24 '11 at 13:52

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