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I'm trying to write a python process which listens on a port and when a client connects to it, it starts up a thread which does the following:

  1. Connects to a remote service (http://193.108.24.18:8000/magicFM)

  2. Passes any data received to the connected client (which happens to be Windows Media Player)

The story is that I want to listen to my radio at work, but I cannot because I am in another country(available only nationally) and I cannot change the proxy settings on my computer.... But I have this server which I would like to use as a proxy.

Thanks in advance.

Here's what I did so far:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import socket, urllib2

TCP_IP = '0.0.0.0'
TCP_PORT = 5566
BUFFER_SIZE = 16 * 1024  #16 kb/s
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.bind((TCP_IP, TCP_PORT))
s.listen(1)
conn, addr = s.accept()
print 'Connection address:', addr
req = urllib2.urlopen('http://193.108.24.18:8000/magicFM')

while 1:
    chunk = req.read(BUFFER_SIZE)
    if not chunk: break
    conn.send(chunk)


conn.close()

but it fails... with:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./magicfmproxy.py", line 17, in ?
    conn.send(chunk)
socket.error: (32, 'Broken pipe')
share|improve this question
    
There is plenty of software which does this already, e.g. tcptunnel – hamstergene Oct 24 '11 at 12:17
    
You could also create a SOCKS proxy using Putty & then use Proxifier to force WMP to use that SOCKS proxy you just created. – Abhijeet Rastogi Oct 24 '11 at 12:20
1  
TO be future compatible, change '0.0.0.0' to '' and AF_INET to AF_INET6. It still works with IPv4, but will do so as well with IPv6. – glglgl Oct 24 '11 at 13:23
    
You can also try port forwarding using an ssh client e.g., Putty – ianalis Oct 24 '11 at 15:42

As a start, to connect to a remote site using TCP, use this code

import socket, struct

def connectToHost(host, port=80, timeout=0):
    try:
            sock=socket.socket()
            timeval=struct.pack("2I", timeout, 0)
            sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_RCVTIMEO, timeval)
            sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_SNDTIMEO, timeval)
            sock.connect((host, port))
            return sock
    except:
            return None

You now have an open socket connected to a remote server. You would have to create a listen socket and wait on this one for a connection. As soon as the connection is there, multiplex data streams using select.

I don't have the time right now, this code is more of a sketch how it might look like. You would need proper error handling and maybe nice error messages in this function, but if noone comes up with a complete solution I may make the effort to complete this code.

share|improve this answer
    
right, the the only think I don't get is how to connect to 193.108.24.18:8000/magicFM – ren Oct 24 '11 at 12:36
    
it's a http sort of service, is it possible to use urllib2 to download chunks of data and send them to the client ? – ren Oct 24 '11 at 12:38
    
That means connect to host 193.108.24.18 using port 8000, and fetch the right URL. Maybe you're better of using one of the URL/HTTP modules. In case you want to do it by hand, call connectoToHost("193.108.24.18", 8000) and write "GET magicFM HTTP/1.0\n\n" into the socket. – hochl Oct 24 '11 at 12:43
    
here's what I did so far: #!/usr/bin/env python import socket, urllib2 TCP_IP = '0.0.0.0' TCP_PORT = 5566 BUFFER_SIZE = 16 * 1024 #16 kb/s s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM) s.bind((TCP_IP, TCP_PORT)) s.listen(1) conn, addr = s.accept() print 'Connection address:', addr req = urllib2.urlopen('193.108.24.18:8000/magicFM') while 1: chunk = req.read(BUFFER_SIZE) if not chunk: break conn.send(chunk) conn.close() – ren Oct 24 '11 at 12:58
    
have a look at post again.... – ren Oct 24 '11 at 13:00

I can only guess, but maybe your problem lives on the client side.

I don't know which connections your client tries to establish, but maybe there is a clash between what is expected and what is really transmitted:

  • You get a connection from your client, which probably sends some request data.
  • If these don't match with the data you send to the stream with urllib2.urlopen(), or the answer from there doesn't match, the client cancels the connection, letting you have a broken socket.

I see two solutions:

Either

  • Try to send the answer line (HTTP/x.x 200 OK or such) and the headers back to your client as well - it should be somewhere in req.headers or so.

Or

  • don't do a urllib2.urlopen() at all, but just open a regular socket connection to there. But then you'll probably have to tamper with the headers of the request - the Host: header will probably have to be replaced.
share|improve this answer

To extend glglgl answer: your problem is in breaking protocol.

HTTP protocol specifies:

  • user request GET /magicFM ...
  • server response with metadata 200 OK ...
  • server continued response with actual data

See more for details: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP

urllib2.urlopen hides all this complication from you making it look as simple as reading file, though your client expect proxy to behave as normal http-server. Here urlopen is a wrong abstraction for you. Best strategy would be to open socket to server and start two parallel loops:

  • reading from client, writing to server
  • reading from server, writing to client

(or do it in one loop with non-blocking reads; or do asyncio)

There might be a complication: http-protocol specifies "Host" header which your client will send in request to proxy with proxy address as a value, depending on behavior of your radio-server you might need to rewrite "Host: ..." in client request to correct address (though in modern Internet usually it doesn't matter).

Also interesting side effect you will notice would be: proxy would not contain any information about specific URLs to open, as your media client will provide them for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Key point is that http is bi-directional: client writes request to server, server writes response to client. – Андрей Татаринов Oct 25 '11 at 10:40
    
yes, I understand that. If you have a look at the my current solution you will notice that I took this into account, however there's still something I miss :s – ren Oct 25 '11 at 11:29
    
Your current solution does one-directional data transfer from server to client. It is not obvious that 'GET /magicFM HTTP/1.0\n\n' would be sufficient to trigger streaming, server might expect something else from client. You can check this by executing telnet 193.108.24.18 8000 and typing in there GET /magicFM HTTP/1.0 with two enters. (I can't even ping this IP either because of mistake in IP or because of I'm in Europe) – Андрей Татаринов Oct 25 '11 at 11:49
    
I've done that.. telnet is ok, even telnet to my ip and my port start the flow, however I think it's Widndows media player that does something. Sorry my current solution if a bit different to what I have in my answer, I'll have it updated now. – ren Oct 25 '11 at 12:21
    
You should really read everything from conn and dump it to see whether started flow is what media player expects, it well might ask for some additional metadata beforehand. Proxying both request and response is the only clean way, otherwise you're forced to reverse engineer protocol and implement all the bits yourself. – Андрей Татаринов Oct 25 '11 at 12:30

Here's my current solution

#!/usr/bin/env python
import socket, urllib2, struct


def connectToHost(host, port=80, timeout=0):
     sock=socket.socket()
     timeval=struct.pack("2I", timeout, 0)
     sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_RCVTIMEO, timeval)
     sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_SNDTIMEO, timeval)
     sock.connect((host, port))
     return sock


TCP_IP = '0.0.0.0'
TCP_PORT = 8000
BUFFER_SIZE = 16 * 1024  #16 kb/s
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.bind((TCP_IP, TCP_PORT))
s.listen(1)
conn, addr = s.accept()
print 'Connection address:', addr
req = connectToHost("193.108.24.18", 8000)
req.send(conn.recv(1024))

chunk = req.recv(2*1024).replace('icy-url:http://193.108.24.18:8000/magicFM', 'icy-url:http://petyo.net:8000/')
print chunk
while 1:
     conn.send(chunk)
     chunk = req.recv(BUFFER_SIZE)
     if not chunk: break
print "Exiting..."
conn.close()

Unfortunately.. I still cannot get it to work. This time Windows Media Player says cannot connect to server 'blah blah,' Althou I see the connection is there!

C00D11B3: Encountered a network error
share|improve this answer

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