Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to play 2 sounds (e.g. 220Hz and 440Hz) at the same time in Java.

I managed to play one sound using StdAudio. Later on, I made it not static, and removed some methods that are irrelevant for me.

What I don't know is how to play 2 sounds at the same time. I tried to do that with thread but they aren't always synchronized.

Below is my modified version of StdAudio, and here is the example of how I tried to use threads.

program.java

public class program {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread t1 = new Thread(new soundThread(220));
        t1.start();
        Thread t2 = new Thread(new soundThread(440));
        t2.start();

        t1.notify();
        t2.notify();
    }

}

soundThread.java

public class soundThread implements Runnable {
    private int fq;

    public soundThread(int fq) {
        this.fq = fq;
    }

    public void run() {
        StdAudio s = new StdAudio();
        double[] note = s.note(fq, 2, 1);
        try {
            this.wait();
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }

        s.play(note);

        s.close();
    }

}

StdAudio.java

/*************************************************************************
 *  Compilation:  javac this.java
 *  Execution:    java StdAudio
 *  
 *  Simple library for reading, writing, and manipulating .wav files.

 *
 *  Limitations
 *  -----------
 *    - Does not seem to work properly when reading .wav files from a .jar file.
 *    - Assumes the audio is monaural, with sampling rate of 44,100.
 *
 *************************************************************************/

import javax.sound.sampled.*;

/**
 * <i>Standard audio</i>. This class provides a basic capability for creating,
 * reading, and saving audio.
 * <p>
 * The audio format uses a sampling rate of 44,100 (CD quality audio), 16-bit,
 * monaural.
 * 
 * <p>
 * For additional documentation, see <a
 * href="http://introcs.cs.princeton.edu/15inout">Section 1.5</a> of
 * <i>Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach</i> by
 * Robert Sedgewick and Kevin Wayne.
 */
public final class StdAudio {

    /**
     * The sample rate - 44,100 Hz for CD quality audio.
     */
    public final int SAMPLE_RATE = 44100;

    private final int BYTES_PER_SAMPLE = 2; // 16-bit audio
    private final int BITS_PER_SAMPLE = 16; // 16-bit audio
    private final double MAX_16_BIT = Short.MAX_VALUE; // 32,767
    private final int SAMPLE_BUFFER_SIZE = 4096;

    private SourceDataLine line; // to play the sound
    private byte[] buffer; // our internal buffer
    private int bufferSize = 0; // number of samples currently in internal
                                // buffer

    // initializer
    {
        init();
    }

    // open up an audio stream
    private void init() {
        try {
            // 44,100 samples per second, 16-bit audio, mono, signed PCM, little
            // Endian
            AudioFormat format = new AudioFormat((float) SAMPLE_RATE,
                    BITS_PER_SAMPLE, 1, true, false);
            DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class, format);

            line = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
            line.open(format, SAMPLE_BUFFER_SIZE * BYTES_PER_SAMPLE);

            // the internal buffer is a fraction of the actual buffer size, this
            // choice is arbitrary
            // it gets divided because we can't expect the buffered data to line
            // up exactly with when
            // the sound card decides to push out its samples.
            buffer = new byte[SAMPLE_BUFFER_SIZE * BYTES_PER_SAMPLE / 3];
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println(e.getMessage());
            System.exit(1);
        }

        // no sound gets made before this call
        line.start();
    }

    /**
     * Close standard audio.
     */
    public void close() {
        line.drain();
        line.stop();
    }

    /**
     * Write one sample (between -1.0 and +1.0) to standard audio. If the sample
     * is outside the range, it will be clipped.
     */
    public void play(double in) {

        // clip if outside [-1, +1]
        if (in < -1.0)
            in = -1.0;
        if (in > +1.0)
            in = +1.0;

        // convert to bytes
        short s = (short) (MAX_16_BIT * in);
        buffer[bufferSize++] = (byte) s;
        buffer[bufferSize++] = (byte) (s >> 8); // little Endian

        // send to sound card if buffer is full
        if (bufferSize >= buffer.length) {
            line.write(buffer, 0, buffer.length);
            bufferSize = 0;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Write an array of samples (between -1.0 and +1.0) to standard audio. If a
     * sample is outside the range, it will be clipped.
     */
    public void play(double[] input) {
        for (int i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
            play(input[i]);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Create a note (sine wave) of the given frequency (Hz), for the given
     * duration (seconds) scaled to the given volume (amplitude).
     */
    public double[] note(double hz, double duration, double amplitude) {
        int N = (int) (this.SAMPLE_RATE * duration);
        double[] a = new double[N + 1];
        for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++)
            a[i] = amplitude
                    * Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * i * hz / this.SAMPLE_RATE);
        return a;
    }

}

Thanks in advance, Shay Ben Moshe

EDIT: The solution was writing this method:

public double[] multipleNotes(double[] hzs, double duration,
        double amplitude) {
    amplitude = amplitude / hzs.length;
    int N = (int) (SAMPLE_RATE * duration);
    double[] a = new double[N + 1];
    for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++) {
        a[i] = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < hzs.length; j++)
            a[i] += amplitude
                    * Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * i * hzs[j] / SAMPLE_RATE);
    }
    return a;
}

EDIT2: Even better solution for me (O(1) memory):

public void multiplePlay(double[] hzs, double duration, double amplitude) {
    amplitude = amplitude / hzs.length;
    int N = (int) (SAMPLE_RATE * duration);
    double sum;
    for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++) {
        sum = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < hzs.length; j++)
            sum += amplitude
                    * Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * i * hzs[j] / SAMPLE_RATE);
        this.play(sum);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
a quick obvious way to make it work would be to create a new sound by manually averaging the amplitudes and playing that one new sound. Depending on your source you may be losing a bit in quality by mixing two sounds like that but it's really quite easy to do and doesn't require any external lib. –  TacticalCoder Oct 24 '11 at 13:09
    
@user988052, wonderful, just what I needed :) I actually thought of it earlier but I thought it wouldn't work. –  Shay Ben Moshe Oct 24 '11 at 13:21
    
A bit off topic, but I believe you wait/notify is done in wrong way. –  Adrian Shum Jun 17 '13 at 1:29
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Expanding a bit on my comment about simply combining the two sounds into one...

You showed this:

public double[] note(double hz, double duration, double amplitude) {
    int N = (int) (this.SAMPLE_RATE * duration);
    double[] a = new double[N + 1];
    for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++)
        a[i] = amplitude
                * Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * i * hz / this.SAMPLE_RATE);
    return a;
}

So what about mixing yourself the two sounds into one and playing that one unique sound? For example you could do something like this:

public double[] notes(double hz1, double hz2, double duration, double amplitude) {
    final double[] a1 = note( hz1, duration, amplitude );
    final double[] a2 = note( hz2, duration, amplitude );
    final double[] a3 = new double[a2.length];
    for ( int i = 0; i < a1.length; i++ ) {
        a3[i] = (a1[i] + a2[i]) / 2;       
    }
    return a3;
}

And you'd simply call it like that:

final double[] sound = notes(220,400,...,...);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try Pulpcore

share|improve this answer
    
Some more specific details might improve this answer. –  Thomas Jul 2 '13 at 0:53
add comment

The open-sourced OpenAL audio API, available in iOS in the OpenAL framework, provides an interface optimized for positioning sounds in a stereo field during playback. Playing, positioning, and moving sounds works just as it does on other platforms. OpenAL also lets you mix sounds. Here for more: http://developer.apple.com/library/IOS/#documentation/AudioVideo/Conceptual/MultimediaPG/UsingAudio/UsingAudio.html

share|improve this answer
    
Java==Objective-C? –  Shay Ben Moshe Oct 24 '11 at 13:09
    
oh damn I'm sorry, I didn't thoroughly read your answer... –  Gabe Oct 24 '11 at 13:56
add comment

You can play multiple specific-frequency sounds using the JSyn library.

It will work for what you want right now, and you may want to move to it later if you want to do anything more complicated.

http://www.softsynth.com/jsyn/

As an example, I also managed to figure out some slightly more complex sounds here:

JSyn, siren sound using oscillator fed/controlled/inputInto/daisy-chainedTo by another oscillator and a constant...and generating more than one sound

This code will accomplish generating tones at 220 Hz and 440 Hz at once.

com.jsyn.Synthesizer synth = JSyn.createSynthesizer();
com.jsyn.unitgen.SineOscillator sine1 = new SineOscillator();
com.jsyn.unitgen.SineOscillator sine2 = new SineOscillator();
com.jsyn.unitgen.LineOut lineOut = new LineOut();

synth.add(sine1);
synth.add(sine2);
synth.add(lineOut);

sine1.frequency.set(220);
sine2.frequency.set(440);

sine1.output.connect(0, lineOut.input, 0); //left and right channels
sine1.output.connect(0, lineOut.input, 1);
sine2.output.connect(0, lineOut.input, 0); //left and right channels
sine2.output.connect(0, lineOut.input, 1);

lineOut.start();

share|improve this answer
    
You can do exactly what the questioner asked for using JSyn. Why the random comment-less downvote...? –  A.M. Jul 2 '13 at 2:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.