Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found some example source code where the author seems to use bitwise & operator instead of % operator. However when I tried x & 4 it doesn't produce the same value as x % 5.

share|improve this question
1  
@user988052 Still is. 10% faster under .NET (just tested), the code is here ideone.com/BLqZP (but note that on ideone the difference is much smaller). Release + Run Without Debugger. –  xanatos Oct 24 '11 at 13:39
1  
@user988052: Bitwise and is still faster than any general-purpose mod implementation that has to handle all numbers. But this optimization is so well-known and simple that many compilers implement it, so yeah. @xanatos: Be sure to let the JIT warm up first when benchmarking. –  delnan Oct 24 '11 at 13:43
1  
@xanatos: when I'm talking about "much faster" back in the days I'm talking about the bitwise taking one or two CPU cycles and the modulo, using the remainder of a div in a register, needing close to CPU 20 cycles if not more. So when I meant "much faster", I was talking about nearly an order of magnitude faster (10x if not much more, depending on the hardware). I'm not talking about a mere 10% which, as delnan pointed out, may be optimized automatically anyway nowadays ; ) –  TacticalCoder Oct 24 '11 at 14:09
2  
@delnan Wow!! It's true!!! When it's warm!!! it's warm!! No, no differences! Tried a cycle of 100 times and looked only at the last benchmark. C# doesn't fully optimize & and % –  xanatos Oct 24 '11 at 14:13
1  
Compilers can only do this optimisation for unsigned values, or for signed values that are known to be positive. Which means that sometimes a human can perform this optimisation in a case where the compiler can not (because the human has a priori knowledge which the compiler lacks). –  Paul R Oct 24 '11 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

This only works for powers of 2.

In general:

x MOD 2^n

is equivalent to:

x AND (2^n - 1)

Note also that this may be true only for x >= 0, depending on your definition of MOD for x < 0.


To understand why this works, consider what MOD really is - it's just the remainder after performing integer division. In the case of a division by 2^n, we are effectively just shifting a binary value right by n bits and discarding any low order bits that get shifted out, e.g. for an 8 bit binary number

a b c d e f g h

if we divide by 4 = 2^2 then we shift right by 2 bits:

0 0 a b c d e f

The remainder (g h) has been thrown away as a result of the integer division.

If we wanted to know the remainder then we could just extract the bits g h by applying a mask of 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1:

    a b c d e f g h
AND 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
  = 0 0 0 0 0 0 g h

Note that the has has value 3, which in the general case is just 2^n - 1.

Let's try this with some real numbers. Suppose we want to calculate 42 / 4 and get both the quotient and the remainder:

42 = 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

To get the quotient we shift right by 2 bits:

  42 / 4 (decimal)
= 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 >> 2
= 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
= 10 (decimal)

  42 MOD 4 (decimal)
= 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 AND 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
= 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
= 2 (decimal)

So 42/4 = 10 remainder 2.

share|improve this answer

The answer quite simple, try to think in binary.

0000 = 0 AND 11 = 0000 = 0
0001 = 1 AND 11 = 0001 = 1
0010 = 2 AND 11 = 0010 = 2
0011 = 3 AND 11 = 0011 = 3
0100 = 4 AND 11 = 0000 = 0
0101 = 5 AND 11 = 0001 = 1
0110 = 6 AND 11 = 0010 = 2
0111 = 7 AND 11 = 0011 = 3

... and so on.

This have the same result as reminder (% is remainder, formally, not modulus). It works only with powers of 2 and only for zero and positive numbers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.