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I am trying to figure out how template engines evolved. But it is difficult to find information on the internet. Does somebody has the following knowledge about template engine history:

  • What were the first template engines?
  • How did one go about programming them?
  • Was there an influcence of awk or troff on them?
  • Are the early template engines still in common use somewhere?

Template engines are neither markup nor format conversion utilities.

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2 Answers 2

At some level the basic work of a template engine is just parameter substitution. By that reasoning, C includes or a basic shell script (perhaps with a here document) could be used as a template engine (and in the case of shell scripts, probably were).

O'Reilly used troff to typeset their books for a very long time, and made extensive use of in-house templates. You can also find a list of published books that were made using troff here, though it's a bit out of date.

That said, I don't think awk or troff had anything not present in other languages or typesettings systems that contributed to the use of templates.

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The W3 Word Processor Filters page should answer most of these questions. For more details, here some resources on the evolution of separating content from presentation:

Markup and typesetting languages are the earliest examples of templating. Here is the Wikipedia definition:

A markup language is a modern system for annotating a document in a way that is syntactically distinguishable from the text. The idea and terminology evolved from the "marking up" of manuscripts, i.e., the revision instructions by editors, traditionally written with a blue pencil on authors' manuscripts. Examples are typesetting instructions such as those found in troff and LaTeX, or structural markers such as XML tags.

Here is a diagram:

                        RUNOFF                      "Generic Coding"                 "Editorial Structure Tags"
                   (Jerome Saltzer, 1964)         (William Tunnicliffe, 1967)          (Stanley Rice, pre-1970)
                            |                               |                                     |
                            |                               |                                     |
        TeX          roff - nroff - troff                   |-------------------------------------|
 (Don Knuth, 1977)   (Josef Osanna, 1973)                   |
                                                           GML
                                                    (Charles Goldfarb, 1969)
                                                            |                       SCRIBE
                                                            |                   (Brian Reid, 1980)
                                                            |                          |
                                                            |--------------------------|
                                                          SGML
                                                      (Standard, 1980)
                                                     |                |
                                                     |                |
                                                   HTML              XML
                                            (Berners-Lee, 1990)    (Standard, 1998)

As far as web site templating, SSI is the mother of them all.

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@CookieMonster Thanks for the heads up. I've added further resources. –  Paul Sweatte Sep 27 '12 at 1:33
    
@CookieMonster Thank you, I was misled by the Wikipedia definition: A markup language is a modern system for annotating a document in a way that is syntactically distinguishable from the text. The idea and terminology evolved from the "marking up" of manuscripts, i.e., the revision instructions by editors, traditionally written with a blue pencil on authors' manuscripts. Examples are typesetting instructions such as those found in troff and LaTeX, or structural markers such as XML tags. –  Paul Sweatte Sep 27 '12 at 22:06
    
@CookieMonster There are one or two unrelated question which reference the use of macros, preprocessors, eval, and regular expressions to create configuration files or write language extensions. Are they closer the question at hand? –  Paul Sweatte Sep 28 '12 at 1:30
    
No usually macros, preprocessors and regular expressions don't make a template engine. –  j4n bur53 Sep 28 '12 at 8:03

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