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A new problem has arisen for me as I tried to run my script on a different PHP Server.

ON my old server the following code appears to work fine - even when no s parameter is declared.

<?php
 if ($_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
if ($_GET['s'] == 'aquinas')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">"; 
 if ($_GET['s'] == 'POP2')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
elseif ($_GET['s'] == null)
echo "<body>"
?>

But now, on a my local server on my local machine (XAMPP - Apache) I get the following error when no value for s is defined.

Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 43
Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 45
Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 47
Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 49

What I want to happen for the script to call certain javascript functions if a value is declared for s, but if nothing is declared i would like the page to load normally.

Can you help me?

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2  
The new server has debug notices enabled. Check for error_reporting in the php.ini. It should not be E_ALL on a production server. –  mario Oct 24 '11 at 14:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Error reporting will have not included notices on the previous server which is why you haven't seen the errors.

You should be checking whether the index s actually exists in the $_GET array before attempting to use it.

Something like this would be suffice:

if (isset($_GET['s'])) {
    if ($_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
    else if ($_GET['s'] == 'aquinas')
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">"; 
    else if ($_GET['s'] == 'POP2')
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
} else {
    echo "<body>";
}

It may be beneficial (if you plan on adding more cases) to use a switch statement to make your code more readable.

switch ((isset($_GET['s']) ? $_GET['s'] : '')) {
    case 'jwshxnsyllabus':
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
        break;
    case 'aquinas':
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">";
        break;
    case 'POP2':
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
        break;
    default:
        echo "<body>";
        break;
}

EDIT: BTW, the first set of code I wrote mimics what yours is meant to do in it's entirety. Is the expected outcome of an unexpected value in ?s= meant to output no <body> tag or was this an oversight? Note that the switch will fix this by always defaulting to <body>.

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1  
more better solution than me. +1 for that –  Awais Qarni Oct 24 '11 at 14:11
    
thanks very neat and helpful –  Jeff Oct 24 '11 at 16:09

Get into the habit of checking if a variable is available with isset, e.g.

if (isset($_GET['s']))
{
     //do stuff that requires 's'
}
else
{
     //do stuff that doesn't need 's'
}

You could disable notice reporting, but dealing them is good hygiene, and can allow you to spot problems you might otherwise miss.

share|improve this answer

You should check wheter the index exists before use it (compare it)

if (isset($_GET['s']) AND $_GET['s'] == 'foobar') {
    echo "foo";
}

Use E_ALL | E_STRICT while developing!

share|improve this answer

First check the $_GET['s'] is set or not. Change your conditions like this

<?php
if (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
elseif (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == 'aquinas')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">"; 
elseif (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == 'POP2')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
elseif (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == null)
echo "<body>"
?>

And also handle properly your ifelse conditions

share|improve this answer

Avoid if, else and elseifs!

$loadMethod = "";
if(isset($_GET['s'])){
    switch($_GET['s']){
        case 'jwshxnsyllabus':
            $loadMethod = "loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml', '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')";
        break;
        case 'aquinas':
            $loadMethod = "loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')";
        break;
        case 'POP2':
            $loadMethod = "loadSyllabi('POP2')";
    }
}

echo '<body onload="'.$loadMethod.'">';

clean, readable code is maintainable code

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I was having the same problem in localhost with xampp. Now I'm using this combination of parameters:

// Report all errors except E_NOTICE
// This is the default value set in php.ini
error_reporting(E_ALL ^ E_NOTICE);

php.net: http://php.net/manual/pt_BR/function.error-reporting.php

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I recommend you check your arrays before you blindly access them :

if(isset($_GET['s'])){
    if ($_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
        /* your code here*/
}

Another (quick) fix is to disable the error reporting by writing this on the top of the script :

error_reporting(0);  

In your case, it is very probable that your other server had the error reporting configuration in php.ini set to 0 as default.
By calling the error_reporting with 0 as parameter, you are turning off all notices/warnings and errors. For more details check the php manual.

Remeber that this is a quick fix and it's highly recommended to avoid errors rather than ignore them.

share|improve this answer
    
Far better to deal with the notice than supress all errors –  Paul Dixon Oct 24 '11 at 14:07
1  
This hides the actual problem but doesn't solve it. It's purely wrong. –  erenon Oct 24 '11 at 14:07
1  
@erenon: Can we please give it a rest? There is not an actual problem or error, but a notice. It doesn't impact the result. No fairy tales please. –  mario Oct 24 '11 at 14:09
    
@mario True but the point is that it's good practice to handle these. –  Rudi Visser Oct 24 '11 at 14:13
    
I for one appreciate this answer -- it helps me understand why I wasn't getting error notices before and it helps me write my code more properly. +1 from me –  Jeff Oct 24 '11 at 16:10

I always use a utility function/class for reading from the $_GET and $_POST arrays to avoid having to always check the index exists... Something like this will do the trick.

class Input {
function get($name) {
    return isset($_GET[$name]) ? $_GET[$name] : null;
}

function post($name) {
    return isset($_POST[$name]) ? $_POST[$name] : null;
}

function get_post($name) {
    return $this->get($name) ? $this->get($name) : $this->post($name);
}
}
$input = new Input;
$page = $input->get_post('page');
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