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I saw a blog post which used non-type variadic templates (currently not supported by gcc, only by clang).

template <class T, size_t... Dimensions>
struct MultiDimArray { /* ... */ };

The example in the post compiles fine but I failed to get it to work with function templates.

Can anyone help figuring out the correct syntax (if such exists)?

int max(int n) { return n; } // end condition

template <int... N> // replacing int... with typename... works
int max(int n, N... rest) // !! error: unknown type name 'N'
{
    int tmp = max(rest...);
    return n < tmp? tmp : n;
}

#include <iostream>
int main() 
{
   std::cout << max(3, 1, 4, 2, 5, 0) << std::endl;   
}
share|improve this question
    
I thought a variadic max already exists in the standard library... but I'm not entirely sure. –  Kerrek SB Oct 24 '11 at 15:03
1  
@Kerrek max isn't the point it's just an example. –  Motti Oct 24 '11 at 15:20
1  
Do you want a non-compile-time function (i.e. max(3,1,4,foo(),5,bar()) as opposed to max<3,1,4,2,5,6>()) that takes an arbitrary number of parameters, all of the same type? And which returns the maximum? –  Aaron McDaid Feb 1 '12 at 1:35
    
@AaronMcDaid, yes, I was looking for a non-compile-time function. I have since seen the errors of my ways thanks to the explanations from Konrad & Luc. –  Motti Feb 1 '12 at 7:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are simply confusing type names and non-type names. What you want simply doesn’t work.

You can probably use variadic non-type templates in functions, but not as (non-template) arguments:

template <int N, int... Rest>
int max()
{
    int tmp = max<Rest...>();
    return N < tmp ? tmp : N;
}
std::cout << max<3, 1, 4, 2, 5, 0>() << std::endl;

… although I haven’t tested this and I’m not sure how this should work given that you need to have a partial specialisation as the base case. You could solve this by dispatching to a partially specialised struct:

template <int N, int... Rest>
struct max_t {
    static int const value = max_t<Rest...>::value > N ? max_t<Rest...>::value : N;
};

template <int N>
struct max_t<N> {
    static int const value = N;
};


template <int... NS>
int max()
{
    return max_t<NS...>::value;
}

This will work.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not looking for a compile time function. By using typename... N we get the same behaviour since the parameters are eventually coerced to int (the first parameter to any overload of max is int) but it's (IMO) a bit less elegant, I would like to specify that this function takes any number of a specific type. One could use initializer_list but then the call site would have to use curly braces. –  Motti Oct 24 '11 at 15:29
1  
@Motti Like my first paragraph says, what you want simply doesn’t work. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 24 '11 at 16:36
3  
@Motti template<int I> void foo(I i); would be nonsensical. You need to understand that before going variadic. –  Luc Danton Oct 24 '11 at 16:44
3  
@Motti: If you're not looking for a compile-time function, then you also aren't looking for non-type template parameters. Non-type template parameters must be compile-time constant expressions. –  Ben Voigt Oct 24 '11 at 16:56
    
@LucDanton when you put it like that it's obvious, variadic templates are messing with my intuition. Apparently I don't grok them yet. –  Motti Oct 24 '11 at 18:36

Here are two ways of defining a variadic function template only accepting int parameters. The first one generates a hard-error when instantiated, the second uses SFINAE:

template<typename... T>
struct and_: std::true_type {};

template<typename First, typename... Rest>
struct and_
: std::integral_constant<
    bool
    , First::value && and_<Rest...>::value
> {};

template<typename... T>
void
foo(T... t)
{
    static_assert(
        and_<std::is_same<T, int>...>::value
        , "Invalid parameter was passed" );
    // ...
}

template<
    typename... T
    , typename = typename std::enable_if<
        and_<std::is_same<T, int>...>::value
    >::type
>
void
foo(T... t)
{
    // ...
}

As you can see, non-type template parameters aren't used here.

share|improve this answer
    
very interesting usage of templates. may have also few applications. :) –  DarioOO Jun 28 '13 at 1:23
template <int N>
void foo(){
  cout << N << endl;
}

template <int N, int M, int ... Rest>
void foo(){
  cout << N << endl;
  foo<M, Rest...>();
}


int main(){
  foo<1, 5, 7>();

  return 0;
}

It will print out all element, Get max could implemented similarly

share|improve this answer
    
I like the way how you avoid the ambiguity. –  Kit Fisto Jul 25 '13 at 16:03

Luc Danton's solution doesn't behave correctly with parameters which are not of type int, but can be implicitly converted to an int. Here's one which does:

template<typename T, typename U> struct first_type { typedef T type; };
template<typename T> int max_checked(T n) { return n; }
template<typename T1, typename T2, typename ...Ts>
int max_checked(T1 n1, T2 n2, Ts ...ns)
{
  int maxRest = max_checked(n2, ns...);
  return n1 > maxRest ? n1 : maxRest;
}
template<typename ...T> auto max(T &&...t) ->
  decltype(max_checked<typename first_type<int, T>::type...>(t...))
{
  return max_checked<typename first_type<int, T>::type...>(t...);
}

struct S { operator int() { return 3; } };
int v = max(1, 2.0, S()); // v = 3.

Here, max forwards all arguments unchanged to max_checked, which takes the same number of arguments of type int (provided by performing a pack-expansion on the first_type template). The decltype(...) return type is used to apply SFINAE if any argument can't be converted to int.

share|improve this answer
    
the calls to Max_checked is ambiguous in the partial ordering of c++11. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 4 '12 at 19:47

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