Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What are the behaviors difference for the Previous Property of Other1 and Other2 Class.

Note than the return type of the ovrloaded Previous Property of Other2 as bean changed to Other2 while it stay as Base for Other1.

Public Class Base
    Private _Previous as Base

    Protected Overridable ReadOnly Property Previous As Base
         Get
             Return _Previous 
         End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub New(Previous as Base)
         _Previous = Previous 
    End Sub
End Class

Public Class Other1
    Inherits Base
    Private _Parent as SomeType

    Protected Overrides ReadOnly Property Previous As Base
         Get
             Return _Parent.Previous.Something
         End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub New(Parent as SomeType)
        MyBase.New(Nothing)
        _Parent = Parent 
    End Sub
End Class

Public Class Other2
    Inherits Base
    Private _Parent as SomeType

    Protected Overloads ReadOnly Property Previous As Other2
         Get
             Return _Parent.Previous.Something
         End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub New(Parent as SomeType)
        MyBase.New(Nothing)
        _Parent = Parent 
    End Sub
End Class
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

After one of my comment to Jim Wooley's answer, "it look like it Shadows the overloaded property." I saw the light in this article.

So, the Overloads in the Other2 class act some more like shadowing than override. There is one of the comments in the article that is particularly instructive :

The confusion arises because the keyword "Overloads" isn't what a C# programmer considers an overload in the traditional OO sense. It's a type of hiding that is specific to VB.Net. You can actually swap the keyword SHADOWS with OVERLOADS in most cases, and the behavior is the same. The difference is when you have a base class with multiple overloaded method signatures. If you declare a method in a subclass with a matching name, and the SHADOWS keyword, it will hide EVERY overload of that method in the base class. If you use the OVERLOADS keyword instead, it will only hide the base class method with an identical signature.

share|improve this answer

Typically you would use Overloads when you are supplying different input parameters. Overrides replaces the functionality. In your case, you want Overrides in Other2 not Overloads. While properties can take parameters other than the value, it is best to not provide them and to use methods rather than properties when passing other values:

Public Class OldMath
   Public Overridable Function DoSomething(val1 As Integer) As Integer
       Return val1 + val1
   End Function
End Class

Public Class NewMath
   Public Overrides Function DoSomething(val1 As Integer) As Integer
      Return val1 * val1
   End Function
   Public Overloads Function DoSomething(val1 As Integer, val2 As Integer) As Integer
      Return val1 * val2
   End Function
End Class
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that, But Overloads allow the modification of the return type to Other2, would it behave like the Overridden Proprety when when the reference if declared as Base type? –  DavRob60 Oct 24 '11 at 16:14
    
Overrides may also be used to add functionality in addition to the overriden method. Very often, you'll see an method override a base method but still call it because it just needed to add a few things for the inheriting class. –  Yatrix Oct 24 '11 at 16:36
    
@DavRob60 You can't overload on the return type, only the input parameters. If your input parameters are different and your return type is different, the one that will be called will be based on the best match of the calling parameters using a narrowing convention to determine the best match. –  Jim Wooley Oct 24 '11 at 17:48
    
@JimWooley You can overload on the return type, if you do it the way I did in Other2. I already know why/how and when someone usually want to overload or override a property/sub/function. The thing I want explanation on is how it will work in this particular case. –  DavRob60 Oct 24 '11 at 18:06
    
Try adding Option Strict On and see if your code continues to work. It may be that it works for your case because you are late binding the results. –  Jim Wooley Oct 24 '11 at 18:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.