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I have a page on my site that uses JS to write out a lot of dynamic content via strings that are then parsed as HTML. Works great in all browsers, but IE6 is incredibly slow. Many users end up getting the "script is unresponsive, would you like to abort?" message.

I've tried using arrays instead of strings to see if IE6 handles those better, but I still get about the same performance. I was wondering if anyone had any clever ideas on how this can be optimized for IE6, or otherwise prevent that unresponsive script message from appearing.


function createTable(){

  var tableStr = "<table><tbody>";

  tableStr += "</tbody></table>";

  for(var x=0; x<contentData.length;x++){
     tableStr += createRow(contentData[x]);
  }

  $("#content").html(tableStr);
}

function createRow(data){
  var rowStr = "<tr>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.name + "</td>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.address + "</td>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.phone + "</td>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.fax + "</td>";
  rowStr += "</tr>";
  return rowStr;
}
share|improve this question
1  
It would help if you would post a sample of relevant code. – Pointy Oct 24 '11 at 14:53
    
Are you using large loops? It is hard to help you to optimize with no code. – epascarello Oct 24 '11 at 14:53
    
IE6 IS slow. Without seeing your code, it's difficult to say what can be optimized. In general you want to do as many HTML manipulations in memory, with as few writes to the DOM as possible. i.e. do much as you can "off screen". – Diodeus Oct 24 '11 at 14:55
    
Yes, very large loops. Standby for sample code. – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 15:02
    
One thing I've found that optimizes IE6 is not setting css via jquery. I guess this is kind of obvious, but it's worth mentioning. – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 19:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look this post with recommendations on how to improve Javascript performance for IE

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is very helpful so far. – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 15:19
function createTable(){

    //show loading message here since it will be a async load
    //$("#loadingMsg").show();

    var tableStr = "<table><tbody>";
    tableStr += "</tbody></table>";

    var rowCnt = 0;
    function buildTable(){

        //break up building table into 50 row chucks
        for(var x=0; x<50 && rowCnt<contentData.length;x++){
            tableStr += createRow(contentData[rowCnt]);
            rowCnt++;
        }

        //if we have not built the table, make a call to build next section
        //The setTimeout keeps the unresponsive message from appearing
        if(rowCnt<contentData.length){
            window.setTimeout(buildTable,0);
        }
        else{  //all rows have been added, set the table with the data
            //hide a loading message
            //$("#loadingMsg").hide();
            $("#content").html(tableStr);
        }
    }

    buildTable(); //kick off the table building

}

function createRow(data){
  var rowStr = "<tr>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.name + "</td>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.address + "</td>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.phone + "</td>";
  rowStr += "<td>" + data.fax + "</td>";
  rowStr += "</tr>";
  return rowStr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am actually doing something like this already. I've broken up my various sections to load one at a time with a split second of breathing room in between. One section still gets halted for some users though. Thank you for the tip. Vote+ – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 15:38
    
Are you actually using a timer to break up the sections? Large for loop with processing is going to cause that message to appear. Also happens if you are adding event handlers to tons of elements. Make sure it is happening in the build process or another area. – epascarello Oct 24 '11 at 15:40
    
I'm just using a setTimeout after the loading of each section ends, not a timer per se. I'll look into that. – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 18:38

The best solution is to point users to http://www.ie6countdown.com/ - a site created by Microsoft to rid the world of IE6. I think it says a lot when a company begs customers to stop using one of their products.

But you're probably in no position to do this. The best solution to solve this kind of scenario in IE6 is to build the HTML on the server; string operations and assigning to innerHTML is very slow on IE6 and there are no "tricks" to make it faster.

To give you an idea: I had to display 2MB of HTML. IE6 loaded that from disk in less than one second. Adding the same HTML to an existing page by assigning to innerHTML took 110 seconds.

Or you can split the adding using a timer to avoid blocking the page. See this answer: Ways to increase performance when set big value to innerHTML

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... I think the remaining 1.4% in the US is the client I'm currently working with for this project. – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 15:03

Have you considered using a templating engine? There are multiple templating engines available for jQuery/javascript that may help in this situation.

Check out this stack overflow question

share|improve this answer
    
I have, but it doesn't fit the current project. The client is already using what we have in place, they don't want something different, just more optimized. – Maxx Oct 24 '11 at 18:36

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