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I have a very large data set (more than 5 millions items) and I need to get N largest items from it. The most natural way to do it is to use heap/priority queue storing only top N items. There are several good implementations of priority queue for JVM (Scala/Java), namely:

First 2 are nice, but they store all the items, which in my case gives critical memory overhead. Third (Lucene implementation) doesn't have such a drawback, but as I can see from documentation it also doesn't support custom comparator, which makes it useless for me.

So, my question is: Is there a PriorityQueue implementation with fixed capacity and custom comparator?

UPD. Finally I've created my own implementation, based on Peter's answer:

public class FixedSizePriorityQueue<E> extends TreeSet<E> {

    private int elementsLeft;

    public FixedSizePriorityQueue(int maxSize) {
        super(new NaturalComparator());
        this.elementsLeft = maxSize;
    }

    public FixedSizePriorityQueue(int maxSize, Comparator<E> comparator) {
        super(comparator);
        this.elementsLeft = maxSize;
    }


    /**
     * @return true if element was added, false otherwise
     * */
    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        if (elementsLeft == 0 && size() == 0) {
            // max size was initiated to zero => just return false
            return false;
        } else if (elementsLeft > 0) {
            // queue isn't full => add element and decrement elementsLeft
            boolean added = super.add(e);
            if (added) {
                elementsLeft--;
            }
            return added;
        } else {
            // there is already 1 or more elements => compare to the least
            int compared = super.comparator().compare(e, this.first());
            if (compared == 1) {
                // new element is larger than the least in queue => pull the least and add new one to queue
                pollFirst();
                super.add(e);
                return true;
            } else {
                // new element is less than the least in queue => return false
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
}

(where NaturalComparator is taken from this question)

share|improve this question
    
My humble opinions on your implementation: 1) Do you really need to extend TreeSet? "FixedSizePriorityQueue is a TreeSet" doesn't sound well, I would make the set a member instead. 2) You don't really need to add state to your class by making elementsLeft a non-final variable. 3) Are you sure the add method always returns the correct value? 4) It'd be good practice to guard against null or illegal arguments. –  Murat Derya Özen Sep 27 '13 at 20:08
    
@Murat: Thanks for suggestions. Feel free to post your improved implementation as an answer here. –  ffriend Sep 27 '13 at 21:17
    
You're welcome and thank you:) posted it as an answer. –  Murat Derya Özen Sep 27 '13 at 21:57

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could use a SortedSet e.g. TreeSet with a custom comparator and remove the smallest when the size reachs N.

share|improve this answer

Below is the implementation I used before. Complies with Peter's suggestion.

 public @interface NonThreadSafe {
 }

/**
 * A priority queue implementation with a fixed size based on a {@link TreeMap}.
 * The number of elements in the queue will be at most {@code maxSize}.
 * Once the number of elements in the queue reaches {@code maxSize}, trying to add a new element
 * will remove the greatest element in the queue if the new element is less than or equal to
 * the current greatest element. The queue will not be modified otherwise.
 */
@NonThreadSafe
public static class FixedSizePriorityQueue<E> {
    private final TreeSet<E> treeSet; /* backing data structure */
    private final Comparator<? super E> comparator;
    private final int maxSize;

    /**
     * Constructs a {@link FixedSizePriorityQueue} with the specified {@code maxSize}
     * and {@code comparator}.
     *
     * @param maxSize    - The maximum size the queue can reach, must be a positive integer.
     * @param comparator - The comparator to be used to compare the elements in the queue, must be non-null.
     */
    public FixedSizePriorityQueue(final int maxSize, final Comparator<? super E> comparator) {
        super();
        if (maxSize <= 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("maxSize = " + maxSize + "; expected a positive integer.");
        }
        if (comparator == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("Comparator is null.");
        }
        this.treeSet = new TreeSet<E>(comparator);
        this.comparator = treeSet.comparator();
        this.maxSize = maxSize;
    }

    /**
     * Adds an element to the queue. If the queue contains {@code maxSize} elements, {@code e} will
     * be compared to the greatest element in the queue using {@code comparator}.
     * If {@code e} is less than or equal to the greatest element, that element will be removed and
     * {@code e} will be added instead. Otherwise, the queue will not be modified
     * and {@code e} will not be added.
     *
     * @param e - Element to be added, must be non-null.
     */
    public void add(final E e) {
        if (e == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("e is null.");
        }
        if (maxSize <= treeSet.size()) {
            final E firstElm = treeSet.first();
            if (comparator.compare(e, firstElm) < 1) {
                return;
            } else {
                treeSet.pollFirst();
            }
        }
        treeSet.add(e);
    }

    /**
     * @return Returns a sorted view of the queue as a {@link Collections#unmodifiableList(java.util.List)}
     *         unmodifiableList.
     */
    public List<E> asList() {
        return Collections.unmodifiableList(new ArrayList<E>(treeSet));
    }
}

I would appreciate any feedback btw.

EDIT: It seems like using a TreeSet is not very efficient after all because the calls to first() seem to take sublinear time. I changed the TreeSet to a PriorityQueue. The modified add() method looks like this:

   /**
     * Adds an element to the queue. If the queue contains {@code maxSize} elements, {@code e} will
     * be compared to the lowest element in the queue using {@code comparator}.
     * If {@code e} is greater than or equal to the lowest element, that element will be removed and
     * {@code e} will be added instead. Otherwise, the queue will not be modified
     * and {@code e} will not be added.
     *
     * @param e - Element to be added, must be non-null.
     */
    public void add(final E e) {
        if (e == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("e is null.");
        }
        if (maxSize <= priorityQueue.size()) {
            final E firstElm = priorityQueue.peek();
            if (comparator.compare(e, firstElm) < 1) {
                return;
            } else {
                priorityQueue.poll();
            }
        }
        priorityQueue.add(e);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! ... IMHO, for the PriorityQueue-based implementation, the asList() method should be something like: List<E> mutableList = new ArrayList<E>(priorityQueue); Collections.sort(mutableList, comparator); return Collections.unmodifiableList( mutableList ); –  Abdull Apr 17 '14 at 3:00

Though an old question but it may be helpful to somebody else. You can use minMaxPriorityQueue of Google's Java library guava.

share|improve this answer
1  
best answer, this one should be accepted –  Julien S. Sep 16 '14 at 12:46
    
still marked as @Beta but has been there since 8.0 so I suspect is pretty solid. –  davem Oct 28 '14 at 2:47

Try this code:

public class BoundedPQueue<E extends Comparable<E>> {
/**
 * Lock used for all public operations
 */
private final ReentrantLock lock;

PriorityBlockingQueue<E> queue ;
int size = 0;

public BoundedPQueue(int capacity){
    queue = new PriorityBlockingQueue<E>(capacity, new CustomComparator<E>());
    size = capacity;
    this.lock = new ReentrantLock();

}

public boolean offer(E e) {


    final ReentrantLock lock = this.lock;
    lock.lock();
    E vl = null;
    if(queue.size()>= size)  {
        vl= queue.poll();
        if(vl.compareTo(e)<0)
            e=vl;
    }

    try {
        return queue.offer(e);
    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }


}

public E poll()  {

    return queue.poll();
}

public static class CustomComparator<E extends Comparable<E>> implements Comparator<E> {


    @Override
    public int compare(E o1, E o2) {
        //give me a max heap
         return o1.compareTo(o2) *-1;

    }
}

}
share|improve this answer

Exactly what I was looking for. However, the implementation contains a bug:

Namely: if elementsLeft > 0 and e is already contained in the TreeSet. In this case, elementsLeft is decreased, but the number of elements in the TreeSet stays the same.

I would suggest to replace the corresponding lines in the add() method by

        } else if (elementsLeft > 0) {
        // queue isn't full => add element and decrement elementsLeft
        boolean added = super.add(e);
        if (added) {
            elementsLeft--;
        }
        return added;
share|improve this answer
    
You are right, thanks! Fixed code in question. –  ffriend Dec 27 '12 at 22:27

How can you say Lucene's doesn't support a custom comparator?

Its abstract and you must implement the abstract method lessThan(T a, T b)

share|improve this answer
1  
Huh, I didn't noticed, thanks! Upvote, but since it requires additional library, I believe another implementation based on standard API is more preferable (see my update). –  ffriend Oct 25 '11 at 22:59

I can't think of a ready-to-use one, but you can check my implementation of this collection with similar requirements.

The difference is the comparator, but if you extend from PriorityQueue you'll have it. And on each addition check if you haven't reached the limit, and if you have - drop the last item.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, standard PriorityQueue doesn't provide easy (and fast) way to remove least element (which with respect to heap structure is quite understandable). So I decided to implement fixed size priority queue on top of TreeSet. Thanks anyway. –  ffriend Oct 25 '11 at 23:03
    
huh? look at poll() –  Robert Muir Oct 25 '11 at 23:14
    
@Robert Muir: poll() removes head of the queue, i.e. greatest element, not the least. –  ffriend Oct 25 '11 at 23:21
    
this is not true. see the javadocs –  Robert Muir Oct 25 '11 at 23:28
    
@Robert Muir: huh, you are right again! I imagined another heap implementation (tree-like) and haven't even thought it is easy to get least element, thus I was sure head is top element and missed this point in javadocs. Now I see it. Thanks again! –  ffriend Oct 25 '11 at 23:56

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