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I have a numpy array that contains some image data. I would like to plot the 'profile' of a transect drawn across the image. The simplest case is a profile running parallel to the edge of the image, so if the image array is imdat, then the profile at a selected point (r,c) is simply imdat[r] (horizontal) or imdat[:,c] (vertical).

Now, I want to take as input two points (r1,c1) and (r2,c2), both lying inside imdat. I would like to plot the profile of the values along the line connecting these two points.

What is the best way to get values from a numpy array, along such a line? More generally, along a path/polygon?

I have used slicing and indexing before, but I can't seem to arrive at an elegant solution for such a where consecutive slice elements are not in the same row or column. Thanks for your help.

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Which line though? There isn't guaranteed to be a unique "line" between two arbitrary entries in a array. The only time such a unique line would exist would be if the two ending entries lay in the same row, same column, same diagonal or anti-diagonal. –  talonmies Oct 24 '11 at 16:05
    
That's true, because the 'line' would have to cut across pixels in a non-uniform way, and that could generate different lines in different calculations. However, I am mainly interested in the trend of the values across the image along this given 'direction' from starting point (r1,c1) to (r2,c2). The particularities of choosing the line are not really important to my needs. –  arjmage Oct 24 '11 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

@Sven's answer is the easy way, but it's rather inefficient for large arrays. If you're dealing with a relatively small array, you won't notice the difference, if you're wanting a profile from a large (e.g. >50 MB) you may want to try a couple of other approaches. You'll need to work in "pixel" coordinates for these, though, so there's an extra layer of complexity.

There are two more memory-efficient ways. 1) use scipy.ndimage.map_coordinates if you need bilinear or cubic interpolation. 2) if you just want nearest neighbor sampling, then just use indexing directly.

As an example of the first:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

#-- Generate some data...
x, y = np.mgrid[-5:5:0.1, -5:5:0.1]
z = np.sqrt(x**2 + y**2) + np.sin(x**2 + y**2)

#-- Extract the line...
# Make a line with "num" points...
x0, y0 = 5, 4.5 # These are in _pixel_ coordinates!!
x1, y1 = 60, 75
num = 1000
x, y = np.linspace(x0, x1, num), np.linspace(y0, y1, num)

# Extract the values along the line, using cubic interpolation
zi = scipy.ndimage.map_coordinates(z, np.vstack((x,y)))

#-- Plot...
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)
axes[0].imshow(z)
axes[0].plot([x0, x1], [y0, y1], 'ro-')
axes[0].axis('image')

axes[1].plot(zi)

plt.show()

enter image description here

The equivalent using nearest-neighbor interpolation would look something like this:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

#-- Generate some data...
x, y = np.mgrid[-5:5:0.1, -5:5:0.1]
z = np.sqrt(x**2 + y**2) + np.sin(x**2 + y**2)

#-- Extract the line...
# Make a line with "num" points...
x0, y0 = 5, 4.5 # These are in _pixel_ coordinates!!
x1, y1 = 60, 75
num = 1000
x, y = np.linspace(x0, x1, num), np.linspace(y0, y1, num)

# Extract the values along the line
zi = z[x.astype(np.int), y.astype(np.int)]

#-- Plot...
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)
axes[0].imshow(z)
axes[0].plot([x0, x1], [y0, y1], 'ro-')
axes[0].axis('image')

axes[1].plot(zi)

plt.show()

enter image description here

However, if you're using nearest-neighbor, you probably would only want samples at each pixel, so you'd probably do something more like this, instead...

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

#-- Generate some data...
x, y = np.mgrid[-5:5:0.1, -5:5:0.1]
z = np.sqrt(x**2 + y**2) + np.sin(x**2 + y**2)

#-- Extract the line...
# Make a line with "num" points...
x0, y0 = 5, 4.5 # These are in _pixel_ coordinates!!
x1, y1 = 60, 75
length = int(np.hypot(x1-x0, y1-y0))
x, y = np.linspace(x0, x1, length), np.linspace(y0, y1, length)

# Extract the values along the line
zi = z[x.astype(np.int), y.astype(np.int)]

#-- Plot...
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)
axes[0].imshow(z)
axes[0].plot([x0, x1], [y0, y1], 'ro-')
axes[0].axis('image')

axes[1].plot(zi)

plt.show()

enter image description here

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1  
(+1) Love the pictures. :-) –  NPE Oct 24 '11 at 19:25
    
Nice answer. The only point I don't get is why the solution I proposed is slower (I didn't do timings, so I'm not even convinced it is). –  Sven Marnach Oct 24 '11 at 21:01
    
Thanks for that fantastic answer, and +5 for the eyecandy. I have learnt several things (and new functions!) from this comprehensive answer. May the stack never overflow on thee. :) –  arjmage Oct 25 '11 at 14:26
    
@SvenMarnach Perhaps, it is not going to be particularly slower actually, given that both the methods are essentially running interpolation operations on the array. However, the nearest-neighbor approach comes closest to answering my question -- but now I see that interpolation is perhaps not a bad way to go. Thank you also for your response. –  arjmage Oct 25 '11 at 14:27
    
@Sven - For what it's worth, I think your answer as-is doesn't do what you think... Your zvalues will be a 100x100 2D array, not a 100-element 1D array. That aside, though, I've usually found map_coordinates to be faster than FITPACK's BivariateSpline (which is what scipy.interpolate.interp2d uses) for the use case of interpolating at a few points from a large regular grid. –  Joe Kington Oct 25 '11 at 14:56

Probably the easiest way to do this is to use scipy.interpolate.interp2d():

# construct interpolation function
# (assuming your data is in the 2-d array "data")
x = numpy.arange(data.shape[1])
y = numpy.arange(data.shape[0])
f = scipy.interpolate.interp2d(x, y, data)

# extract values on line from r1, c1 to r2, c2
num_points = 100
xvalues = numpy.linspace(c1, c2, num_points)
yvalues = numpy.linspace(r1, r2, num_points)
zvalues = f(xvalues, yvalues)
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I've been testing the above routines with galaxy images and think I found a small error. I think a transpose needs to be added to the otherwise great solution provided by Joe. Here is a slightly modified version of his code that reveals the error. If you run it without the transpose, you can see the profile doesn't match up; with the transpose it looks okay. This isn't apparent in Joe's solution since he uses a symmetric image.

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.misc # ADDED THIS LINE

#-- Generate some data...
x, y = np.mgrid[-5:5:0.1, -5:5:0.1]
z = np.sqrt(x**2 + y**2) + np.sin(x**2 + y**2)
lena = scipy.misc.lena()  # ADDED THIS ASYMMETRIC IMAGE
z = lena[320:420,330:430] # ADDED THIS ASYMMETRIC IMAGE

#-- Extract the line...
# Make a line with "num" points...
x0, y0 = 5, 4.5 # These are in _pixel_ coordinates!!
x1, y1 = 60, 75
num = 500
x, y = np.linspace(x0, x1, num), np.linspace(y0, y1, num)

# Extract the values along the line, using cubic interpolation
zi = scipy.ndimage.map_coordinates(z, np.vstack((x,y))) # THIS DOESN'T WORK CORRECTLY
zi = scipy.ndimage.map_coordinates(np.transpose(z), np.vstack((x,y))) # THIS SEEMS TO WORK CORRECTLY

#-- Plot...
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)
axes[0].imshow(z)
axes[0].plot([x0, x1], [y0, y1], 'ro-')
axes[0].axis('image')

axes[1].plot(zi)

plt.show()

Here's the version WITHOUT the transpose. Notice that only a small fraction on the left should be bright according to the image but the plot shows almost half of the plot as bright.

Without Transpose

Here's the version WITH the transpose. In this image, the plot seems to match well with what you'd expect from the red line in the image.

With Transpose

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