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I'm going through a phase of trying to avoid temporary variables and over-use of conditional where I can use a more fluid style of coding. I've taken a great liking to using #tap in places where I want to get the value I need to return, but do something with it before I return it.

def fluid_method
  something_complicated(a, b, c).tap do |obj|
    obj.update(:x => y)
  end
end

Vs. the procedural:

def non_fluid_method
  obj = something_complicated(a, b, c)
  obj.update(:x => y)
  obj # <= I don't like this, if it's avoidable
end

Obviously the above examples are simple, but this is a pretty common coding style in the ruby community nonetheless. I'll sometimes use #inject to pass an object through a series of filters too:

things.inject(whatever) do |obj, thing|
  thing.filter(obj)
end

Vs. the procedural:

obj = whatever
things.each do |thing|
  obj = thing.filter(obj)
end
obj

Now I'm facing repeated use of a condition like the following, and looking for a more fluid approach to handling it:

def not_nice_method
  obj = something_complex(a, b, c)
  if a_predicate_check?
    obj.one_more_method_call
  else
    obj
  end
end

The (slightly) cleaner solution is to avoid the temporary variable at the cost of duplication:

def not_nice_method
  if a_predicate_check?
    something_complex(a, b, c).one_more_method_call
  else
    something_complex(a, b, c)
  end
end

I can't help but feeling the desire to use something almost like #tap here though.

What other patterns might I follow here. I realise this is all just nonsensical sugar to some people and that I should just move onto more interesting problems, but I'm trying to learn to write in a more functional style, so I'm just curious what long-term rubyists have determined to be good ways to tackle situations like this. These examples are hugely simplified.

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3  
At the risk of being pedantic, it seems that your use of tap to induce side-effects is anti-functional. Functional programmers and languages avoid or prevent side-effects. The point of tap is that it won't return what gets executed in it. Thus, it can be used two ways: debugging and methods that induce side-effects. The functional way is simply to chain methods together or composite them. –  Erik Hinton Oct 24 '11 at 16:31
    
No risk, I'd like to talk theory, though I fear this thread would be closed if there's no direct question, however, given that #update would return a boolean, not the value of obj (which is beyond my control), doesn't tap solve the need for a third expression to return the original value? I would like to understand more correct functional techniques :) –  d11wtq Oct 24 '11 at 16:35
    
Ah, I see how I could change that: update(something_complex(a, b, c)), where I have defined update to do argument.update(:x => y)... though this gets more verbose as the update parameters need passing in. –  d11wtq Oct 24 '11 at 16:38
    
Well, it'd just be syntactic sugar for writing a lambda and calling it. You could us it to change a value in the middle of a chain, like 3.tweak { |i| i * 2 } # returns 6 which is equivalent to lambda { 3 * 2 }.call. It would also let you create and use references mid-chain: 5.tweak { |id| obj = expensive_lookup(id); obj.ready? && obj.valid? } which is equiv to lambda { obj = lookup(id); obj.ready? && obj.valid? }.call. –  Kache Jun 20 at 21:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In my extensions module I define a Object#as (similar to tap, but purely functional, just a yield self) that would allow you to write:

def not_sure_this_is_nice_enough_method
  something_complex(a, b, c).as do |obj| 
    a_predicate_check? ? obj.one_more_method_call : obj
  end
end

Not that this is much more beautiful, but this kind of scoping may come handy.

Another idea: if you find yourself writing a lot this pattern, it wouldn't be too bold to abstract it, something like this:

def not_sure_this_is_nice_enough_method2
  something_complex(a, b, c).send_if(a_predicate_check?, :one_more_method)
end

Or as you propose in a comment:

def not_sure_this_is_nice_enough_method3
  something_complex(a, b, c).on(a_predicate_check?) { |obj| obj.one_more_method }
end
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Ohhh, your Object#as trick is definitely better (to my eyes) than the assign; if..else..end version. You could probably have an some_method(a, b).on(a_predicate?) { |obj| obj.whatever } too. I may take your as and reverse it slightly, adding with to the caller: with(something_complex(a, b)) { |obj| a_predicate? obj.whatever : obj }. Hmmm. –  d11wtq Oct 24 '11 at 17:17
    
@d11wtq: Indeed, the on { } looks also nice, it's usually better to call a method instead of concealing it with send(:methods) wrappers (the problem is you must give it name). Note that your with(x) { |x| ... } is in fact Ick's let: ick.rubyforge.org –  tokland Oct 24 '11 at 17:35
    
Ick looks interesting, though I suspect it won't play well with RSpec, since it has a let method of its own, behaving completely differently :) –  d11wtq Oct 25 '11 at 2:10
    
I will accept your answer, though I'll give it another few hours to see if anybody else has any thoughts. –  d11wtq Oct 25 '11 at 2:11

I found a method in the Facets gem that might be what you were looking for: Kernel#ergo

So your original method:

def not_nice_method
  obj = something_complex(a, b, c)
  if a_predicate_check?
    obj.one_more_method_call
  else
    obj
  end
end

might end up looking something like this:

require 'facets/kernel/ergo'

def nice_method
  something_complex(a, b, c).ergo do |_| 
    a_predicate_check? ? _.one_more_method_call : _
  end
end
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