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I've created a custom annotation view by subclassing MKAnnotationView. This class also creates a custom callout (info pop-up 'bubble') view which is skinned to match my app.

I also want to be able to reskin the callout bubble for the user location dot, but it seems as though the only control I have over that view is whether it is overridden completely or not, by using the following inside the mapView:viewForAnnotation: method:

    if(annotation == self.mapView.userLocation)
    {
        return nil;
    }

But want I really want to do is find out what annotation view MapKit is using for the user location blue dot, and then subclass it so I can skin its callout bubble... Or is there another way? Or just no way at all?

Thanks :)

:-Joe

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3 Answers

I am not sure this will help you, but you can use the default user location annotation view, then steal the view in mapView:didSelectAnnotationView::

- (void)mapView:(MKMapView *)mapView didSelectAnnotationView:(MKAnnotationView *)view
{
    if (view == [mapView viewForAnnotation:mapView.userLocation]) {
        // do what you want to 'view'
        // ...
    }
    // ...
}

I have used this trick to change the callout title and subtitle, and add an image using leftCalloutAccessoryView. However, I haven't tried totally replacing the callout, so I don't know if it's possible.

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That's a clever thought and I've given it a go, but the only problem is there doesn't seem to be a way of stopping the userLocation annotationView to stop showing its callout, even if I set it to NO. Any thoughts? –  jowie Oct 28 '11 at 22:24
1  
You also need to grab the annotation view in mapView:didAddAnnotationViews:. There, you can use the same test as above in the if statement, and set canShowCallout to NO there. –  shawkinaw Oct 30 '11 at 18:50
    
That's brilliant thanks! Nearly there... I notice that the class of the object is MKUserLocationView. Is there any way of extending or subclassing MKUserLocationView to draw the new bubble, or will I have to build the code directly into the view controller? –  jowie Oct 30 '11 at 21:58
    
That I'm not sure about. I do know that MKUserLocationView is private API, so subclassing it might not be desirable. Can you not do what you did with your other annotation view subclass? –  shawkinaw Oct 31 '11 at 0:12
    
Do you know how? I can't subclass MKUserLocationView because as you say it is a private API, so I get the compiler error: "Semantic Issue: 'LMLUserLocationView' cannot use 'super' because it is a root class"... But I need to get the blue flashing dot and I don't get it if I just subclass MKAnnotationView :( –  jowie Oct 31 '11 at 13:23
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You can use

if ([annotation isKindOfClass:[MKUserLocation class]]) { // or if(annotation == self.mapView.userLocation)
   MKAnnotationView * annotationView = [mapView dequeueReusableAnnotationViewWithIdentifier:@"MyLocation"];
   if (annotationView == nil) {
      annotationView = [[[MKAnnotationView alloc] initWithAnnotation:annotation reuseIdentifier:@"MyLocation"] autorelease];
         annotationView.canShowCallout = NO;
         annotationView.image = [UIImage imageNamedWithBrand:@"MyLocationPin.png"];
      } else {
         annotationView.annotation = annotation;
      }
   return annotationView;
}
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That won't work, because it replaces the blue dot with the image "MyLocationPin.png". I want to be able to subclass the annotationView WITH the blue dot, so I can add a custom callout to it... Sorry. –  jowie Oct 25 '11 at 10:02
    
Sorry, I didn't understand your question well. Well… I'm gonna think about your problem :) –  Zoleas Oct 25 '11 at 10:26
    
thanks :) I'll see if I can reword it... Please feel free to edit it if it's not clear enough! –  jowie Oct 25 '11 at 10:37
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I think it is not possible directly, but you can override some methods in runtime with this: http://theocacao.com/document.page/266

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