Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was trying out following 2 Sql queries. I used AdventureWorks 2005 sample database.

/* Query #1 */
SELECT [SalesOrderID] 
  ,[SalesOrderDetailID]
  ,[CarrierTrackingNumber]
  ,[OrderQty]
  ,[ProductID]
  ,[SpecialOfferID]
  ,[UnitPrice]
  ,[UnitPriceDiscount]
  ,[LineTotal]
  ,[rowguid]
  ,[ModifiedDate]
FROM [AdventureWorks].[Sales].[SalesOrderDetail]
WHERE SUBSTRING([CarrierTrackingNumber],1,4) ='4911'

/* Query #2 */
SELECT [SalesOrderID]
  ,[SalesOrderDetailID]
  ,[CarrierTrackingNumber]
  ,[OrderQty]
  ,[ProductID]
  ,[SpecialOfferID]
  ,[UnitPrice]
  ,[UnitPriceDiscount]
  ,[LineTotal]
  ,[rowguid]
  ,[ModifiedDate]
FROM [AdventureWorks].[Sales].[SalesOrderDetail]
WHERE [CarrierTrackingNumber] LIKE '4911%'

and I found that time taken by #1 is less than #2 when there is no index on CarrierTrackingNumber. Can anybody tell me this kind of behavior? Does this mean sub string is faster than like for non indexed column?

However as soon as i applied the index #2 is too faster than #1 as we know like works faster on indexed column.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Query #1 is nonSARGable due to the substring function, so the index cannot help that query.

share|improve this answer

Possible answer:

Substring computation and string equality comparisons are faster than like-pattern matching.

Left-side-constant like-pattern matching against an indexed string column is optimized to an index range scan, but no such optimization is implemented for prefix-substrings.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.