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I have a simple function that returns a time object based on a time string:

FUNCTION getTime(timeStr)RESULT(time)
IMPLICIT NONE
CHARACTER(LEN=19),INTENT(IN) :: timeStr
TYPE timeType
 INTEGER :: yyyy,mo,dd,hh,mm,ss
ENDTYPE timeType
TYPE(timeType) :: time
READ(UNIT=timeStr( 1: 4),'(I4)')time%yyyy
READ(UNIT=timeStr( 6: 7),'(I2)')time%mo
READ(UNIT=timeStr( 9:10),'(I2)')time%dd
READ(UNIT=timeStr(12:13),'(I2)')time%hh
READ(UNIT=timeStr(15:16),'(I2)')time%mm
READ(UNIT=timeStr(18:19),'(I2)')time%ss
ENDFUNCTION getTime

I call it from the parent routine as:

umwmTime1=getTime(umwmStartTimeStr)
umwmTime2=getTime(umwmStopTimeStr)

where umwmTime 1 and 2 are declared as:

TYPE timeType
  INTEGER :: yyyy,mo,dd,hh,mm,ss
ENDTYPE timeType
TYPE(timeType) :: umwmTime1,umwmTime2

The compile error message I get is:

PGF90-S-0099-Illegal use of derived type (ESMF_interface_UMWM.F90: 282)
PGF90-S-0099-Illegal use of derived type (ESMF_interface_UMWM.F90: 283)
  0 inform,   0 warnings,   2 severes, 0 fatal for umwm_component_run

Lines 282 and 283 point are function calls in the parent routine.

However if I use subroutine (instead of function) to get umwmTime1 and umwmTime2 as INTENT(OUT) arguments, I get no problems. What am I doing wrong with the function?

share|improve this question
    
does it work if you deal with a local time variable within the function, and then copy the final result into the return variable? –  ev-br Oct 24 '11 at 17:27
    
Zhenya, no, that does not make a difference. –  milancurcic Oct 24 '11 at 17:47
    
IRO-bot: well then, a brute force way would be to declare the time type outside of the function, so that it can be explicitly declared as returning the timeType object –  ev-br Oct 24 '11 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is the compiler doesn't know that the timetype you defined in the main program is the same as the timetype that you defined in the function. You should define that one place, preferably in a module, and let that define the type everywhere.

For instance, in a simple one-file program, the code you provided doesn't work for me in gfortran, but this does:

MODULE timeTypeDef
TYPE timeType
    INTEGER :: yyyy,mo,dd,hh,mm,ss
ENDTYPE timeType
END MODULE timeTypeDef

PROGRAM foo
USE timeTypeDef
IMPLICIT NONE

TYPE(timeType) :: umwmTime1, umwmTime2

umwmTime1=getTime('2010-10-10-14:39:03')
umwmTime2=getTime('2011-11-11-09:17:53')

contains

FUNCTION getTime(timeStr)RESULT(time)
    USE timeTypeDef
    IMPLICIT NONE
    CHARACTER(LEN=19),INTENT(IN) :: timeStr
    TYPE(timeType) :: time

    READ(UNIT=timeStr( 1: 4),FMT='(I4)')time%yyyy
    READ(UNIT=timeStr( 6: 7),FMT='(I2)')time%mo
    READ(UNIT=timeStr( 9:10),FMT='(I2)')time%dd
    READ(UNIT=timeStr(12:13),FMT='(I2)')time%hh
    READ(UNIT=timeStr(15:16),FMT='(I2)')time%mm
    READ(UNIT=timeStr(18:19),FMT='(I2)')time%ss
ENDFUNCTION getTime

END PROGRAM foo
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is the correct answer. Thank Johnathan. Now that I think about it, I have no idea why I declared the type in two places. –  milancurcic Oct 24 '11 at 21:23

Put you function "getTime" within a module and USE that module in the calling routine.

The problem is that the calling routine does not know that the routine function getTime returns a TYPE(timeType). By default, getTime is considered as a real scalar value. Therefore, you need an explicit interface which is easily provided by a USE statement. This interface may be also provided by an INTERFACE block but this is not advised because error prone.

I would like also to point out that the declaration "CHARACTER(len=19)" of the argument timeStr is very dangerous. I suggest instead :

FUNCTION getTime(timeStr)RESULT(time)
IMPLICIT NONE
CHARACTER(LEN=*),INTENT(IN) :: timeStr
...

Indeed any call to that function with a string argument having less that 19 characters is wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Francois, both subroutine and function are inside the same module. As for timeStr, I enforce the timeStr to be always same length (ISO 8601 time format). –  milancurcic Oct 24 '11 at 17:45
1  
Ah yes, I missed what Jonathan noticed : you declared twice the derived type timeType. Put the definition only once in your module before the keyword CONTAINS : you don't necessarily need to declare it in a new module as Jonathan suggested. –  Francois Jacq Oct 24 '11 at 20:58

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