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I currently have this schema:

CREATE TABLE `users` (
  `users_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `users_name` varchar(50),
  `users_lastname` varchar(50),
  `users_dob` date,
  `users_type` int(11) NOT NULL default 0,
  `users_access` int(11) NOT NULL default 0,
  `users_level` int(11) NOT NULL default 0,
  /* etc...*/
  PRIMARY KEY (`users_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE `users_types` (
  `types_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `types_name` varchar(50),
  PRIMARY KEY (`types_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

/* etc..*/

Query:

SELECT
    types_name AS user_type, 
    /* all other fields*/
    users.*
    FROM users
    INNER JOIN users_types ON (users.users_type=types_id);
    /* INNER JOIN for all other tables*/
/* Rest of query */

My new solution:

CREATE TABLE `users` (
  `users_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `users_name` varchar(50),
  `users_lastname` varchar(50),
  `users_dob` date,
  `users_type` ENUM('type1', 'type2', 'type3'),
  `users_access` ENUM('access1', 'access2', 'access3'),
  `users_level` ENUM('level1', 'level2', 'level3'),
  /* etc...*/
  PRIMARY KEY (`users_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

Query:

SELECT
    *
    FROM users

From what I see is using ENUM is very simple and can be very fast to execute.

  1. Am I right? Would it be faster for the MySQL Engine to process an ENUM type field rather than having LEFT JOINs?
  2. Is using ENUM a good practice?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Tables are good if the enum list will be changed. It's just a simple insert/update query. Enums would require an alter table. –  Marc B Oct 24 '11 at 17:57
    
signed integers (4 bytes) for lookup types seems a little excessive - how about unsigned tinyints ? –  f00 Oct 25 '11 at 18:48
    
I should use unsigned int? I have over 200,000 users –  Tech4Wilco Oct 25 '11 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted
+50

Personally, I think the int data type should be used and ENUM-ification of that data should be done in another layer.

The table definition is a poor place to store your gamut of enum values. It's hard to get at easily, and giving your application the power to modify table definitions is a security problem (possibly).

Instead, I would recommend using an INT type and then in your software, creating a model that interacts with the database below to give the appearance of an ENUM.

With this design choice, switching database software is trivial, you don't need to grant "ALTER TABLE" privileges to your production app, and extending your enum is easy. Plus, then you are reducing the number of times that the program needs to do the translation from ENUM -> integer -- it can be done at compile-time instead of with every database SQL request.

share|improve this answer
    
so you will have a file for these options in a separate file and use them as define or something eg: define('USER_ACCESS_ADMIN', 1);? –  Tech4Wilco Oct 26 '11 at 20:33
    
Yes, that's what I would do –  Robert Martin Oct 27 '11 at 3:27
    
thanks for the info –  Tech4Wilco Oct 27 '11 at 12:34

1) Yes, it would be faster, as the ENUM datatype is indexed in the table itself (i.e. no need to read another table for each record)

2) Yes, as long as you don't want to use those fields in any other table. As soon as you want to use a given field in more than one table, you should create a separate lookup table for that field. Also, if you want the field to have user-definable values (and not require them to modify the database directly to change them), you should use a separate table.

share|improve this answer
    
Adding entries to an enum does not actually force a rebuild of the table, so it's more flexible than you think. –  Johan Oct 24 '11 at 18:13
    
I know, it's just a bit more of a pain to maintain it when you have to modify the entry in information_schema.columns to keep your ENUM list up to date. –  Crontab Oct 24 '11 at 18:33
    
It's a simple alter table change column statement, no messing about in the information_schema needed. –  Johan Oct 24 '11 at 18:46
    
Right, if you want the application's MySQL user to have those permissions that would work fine. Not everyone wants an application user to have those permissions though. –  Crontab Oct 25 '11 at 15:46

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