Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the scope of a while and for loop?
For example, if I declared an object within the loop, what is it's behavior and why?

share|improve this question
2  
What is the Home tag? Did you mean Homework? :) –  Alok Save Oct 24 '11 at 19:20
    
yes............. –  T.T.T. Oct 24 '11 at 19:24

10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

In the following examples all the variables are destroyed and recreated for each iteration of the loop except i, which persists between loop iterations and is available to the conditional and final expressions in the for loop. None of the variables are available outside the loops. Destruction of the variables inside the for loop body are destroyed before the i is incremented.

while(int a = foo()) {
    int b = a+1;
}

for(int i=0;
    i<10;     // conditional expression has access to i
    ++i)      // final expression has access to i
{
    int j = 2*i;
}

As for why; loops actually take a single statement for their body, it just happens that there's a statement called a compound statement created by curly braces. The scope of variables created in any compound statement is limited to the compound statement itself. So this really isn't a special rule for loops.

Loops and selection statements do have their own rules for the variables created as a part of the loop or selection statement itself. These are just designed according to whatever the designer felt was most useful.

share|improve this answer
1  
So j and b are created and destroyed each iteration.... –  T.T.T. Oct 24 '11 at 19:33
1  
Yes, and a in the while loop is created and destroyed each iteration as well. –  bames53 Oct 24 '11 at 19:36
    
I wouldn't say that the /variable/ is destroyed... just that it's value is reset. theoretically it should occupy the same memory location each iteration and there is no overhead of creating or destroying anything as far as cpu cycles go. –  Bradley Uffner Oct 25 '11 at 7:29
2  
According to C++ the object is actually destroyed. If it's an object with a destructor the destructor is called. Between the time that happens and when the object is created on the next iteration no object occupies that memory. –  bames53 Oct 25 '11 at 13:41
    
@bames53 That does not seem to be the case. Where in the standard does it say that? Please consider the following snippet which shows the destructor for the loop variable running only once (the second destructor is for the init value): ideone.com/mY1lA –  DuncanACoulter Sep 17 '12 at 14:04

Anything declared in the loop is scoped to that loop and cannot be accessed outside the curly braces. In fact, you don't even need a loop to create a new scope. You can do something like:

{
   int x = 1;
}

//x cannot be accessed here.
share|improve this answer
1  
didn't know that, thanks..... –  T.T.T. Oct 24 '11 at 19:17
1  
+1 that's a bit unknown trick and can sometimes be useful –  teh internets is made of catz Jun 21 '13 at 23:36
    
Not sure how it'd be an unknown trick, probably wouldn't even call it a trick :) It's a pretty darn basic exposition of scope you should be familiar with very early on if you write in C++, not to mention a fundamental in managing fall through or similar propagation cases (no pun intended). –  ThE_JacO Jul 26 '13 at 21:57
int d;
// can use d before the loop
for(int a = 0; a < 5; ++a) // can use a or d in the ()
{
    int b;
    // can use d, a, b in the {}
}
int c; 
// can use d, c after the loop

a and b are only visible in the scope of the for loop. The scope includes what's in the loop's () and {}

share|improve this answer
2  
You might also note that b cannot be used in the loop condition. (more obvious in a do{}while()) –  Mooing Duck Oct 24 '11 at 19:21
2  
This is a correct as it correctly points out that items declared within the () are also scoped. Interestingly enough, MSVC++ compilers before version 8.0 (Visual Studio 2005) were a little buggy with this part of the standard. –  Michael Price Oct 24 '11 at 19:24
    
Interesting, didn't know the () has it's own scope, for going from the loop to the condition (i.e. b) thanks. –  T.T.T. Oct 24 '11 at 19:26

Just wanted to add that variables declared in the for or while loop are also scoped within the loop. For example:

for (int index = 0; index < SOME_MAX; ++index)
{
    ...
}

// index is out of scope here.
share|improve this answer
    
however, based on Pubby8 it looks like it only goes one way... –  T.T.T. Oct 24 '11 at 19:28
    
@Tommy One Way? –  Lou Oct 24 '11 at 20:55
for( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i )
{
  string f = "foo";
  cout << f << "\n";
}
// i and f are both "gone" now

In the above sample code, both i and f are scoped within the {{ and }} When the closing brace is executed, both variables fall out of scope.

The reason for this is simply that the Standard says so; that's how the C++ language works.

As for motivation, consider that this can be used to your advantage:

for( ...)
{ 
  std::auto_ptr<SomeExpensiveObject> obj(new SomeExpensiveObject);
}

In the above code, we are using an RAII smart pointer to "own" the expensive object we created within the loop. The scoping semantics of the for loop dictate that after each execution of the loop, the object that was created during that iteration will be destroyed.

share|improve this answer
2  
Technically, the f is in a more inner scope than the i. –  Mooing Duck Oct 24 '11 at 19:23

In C/C++, the scope of a variable declared in a for or while loop (or any other bracketed block, for that matter) is from the open bracket to the close bracket.

while (some_condition == true)
{
   int myVar = 3;
}
cout << myVar << endl; // This will cause a compilation error
share|improve this answer

The variable is within the scope of the loop. I.e. you need to be within the loop to access it. It's the same as if you declared a variable within a function, only things in the function have access to it.

share|improve this answer
int a;
for(int b=0; b<10; ++b) { 
   int c;
}

scopes as if it were:

int a;
{
    int b=0;
begin:
    if (b<= 10) 
    {
        {
            int c;
        }
        ++b;
        goto begin;
    }
}

The purpose is so that variables go out of scope at clearly defined sequence points.

share|improve this answer
    
nice, that explains what Pubby8 is saying, thank. –  T.T.T. Oct 24 '11 at 19:31

Check out this code

#include < stdio.h >

int i = 10;  
int main() {  

for(int i=0; i<3; i++) {  
    fprintf(stdout," for i = %d & upper i = %d\n",i,::i);

}  

while (i>3) {  
    int i = 30;  
    fprintf(stdout," while i = %d & upper i = %d\n",i,::i);  
    i++;  
    fprintf(stdout," while i = %d & upper i = %d\n",i,::i);  

}  

fprintf(stdout,"i = %d \n",i);  

}

In the code above, the global variable i is different from one which is controlling the for loop.

It will print

for i = 0 & upper i = 10
for i = 1 & upper i = 10
for i = 2 & upper i = 10

when while loop is executed - the variable i defined inside while is having local scope, where as the variable under (i > 3) follows the global variable, and doesn't refer to local scope.

Dipan.

share|improve this answer

I thought it would be worth mentioning:

Some compilers may have an option which effects the scope of variables created within the for loop initializer. For example, Microsoft Visual Studio has an option /Zc:forScope (Force Conformance in for Loop Scope). It defaults to standard c++ behavior. However, this can be changed so that the for loop variable is kept alive outside the for loop scope. If you are using VS it might be useful to be aware that this option exists so you can make sure its set to the desired behavior. Not sure if there are any other compilers which have this option.

Some compilers may eliminate code it thinks is unnecessary, due to optimization settings and "Dead Store" elimination. For example, if the variable being changed inside the loop isn't read anywhere outside the loop, the loop itself may be discarded by the compiler.

For example, consider the following loop:

int cnt = 0;
int trys = MAX_INT;
while (trys-- > 0)
{
  cnt += trys;
}

it is possible that some compilers may discard [the contents of] the loop, because the variable Cnt isn't being used after the loop.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.