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Background: I have a fixed-width flat file with about 94 million rows of data. The file is from the HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/nisoverview.jsp), which provides information about hospitalizations over the past 12 years, each row a separate hospitalization. For my analyses, I will be querying diagnostic codes (ICD9-CM) to identify patients with various diagnoses.

The fixed-width file contains information on up to 15 diagnostic codes, which are provided as columns dx1 through dx15.

create table `core` (`key` char (14),
`dx1` char (5),
`dx10` char (5),
`dx11` char (5),
`dx12` char (5),
`dx13` char (5),
`dx14` char (5),
`dx15` char (5),
`dx19` char (5),
`dx2` char (5),
`dx3` char (5),
`dx4` char (5),
`dx5` char (5),
`dx6` char (5),
`dx7` char (5),
`dx8` char (5),
`dx9` char (5),
plus various other columns of patient demographics...);

I loaded all of the data into a MySQL table, named core, and can index the 15 columns. However, it seems advantageous to kind of normalize the dx* columns into a separate dx table, such as;

create table `dx` (
`key` char (14),
`icd9` char (5),
);

where key is a foreign key to the main core table. To load the data quickly into dx, I use:

LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 'data.ASC' INTO TABLE `dx` (@var1) SET `key` = substr(@var1, 1, 14), `icd9` = substr(@var1, 74, 5);
LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 'data.ASC' INTO TABLE `dx` (@var1) SET `key` = substr(@var1, 1, 14), `icd9` = substr(@var1, 79, 5);
LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 'data.ASC' INTO TABLE `dx` (@var1) SET `key` = substr(@var1, 1, 14), `icd9` = substr(@var1, 84, 5);
etc for all 15 columns...

The catch is that the each row in the fixed-width file only has a median of 3 diagnosis codes, so most of the dx* columns are just blank (' ' [five blank characters]). So, while the dx table has 1.41 billion (94 million * 15) rows after loading data, about 1.28 billion (94 million * 12) are blank diagnostic codes.

I've been simply removing them afterwards and optimizing, prior to indexing:

DELETE FROM `dx` WHERE `icd9` = "     ";
OPTIMIZE TABLE `dx`;
CREATE INDEX `icd9` ON `dx` (`icd9`);

However, this takes a lot of time.

Question: Is it possible to modify the LOAD DATA INFILE statement to skip the row if ICD9 = ' '[five blank characters], and would this be significantly faster than my current DELETE and OPTIMIZE method? If there is, I would like to pass this information on to future researchers working with these data.

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Consider inverting the question. Produce the data load input file in such a way that it only contains rows you want. –  DwB Oct 24 '11 at 19:27
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It is not possible to add conditions to LOAD DATA INFILE. You either need to preprocess the file being loaded, or generate the file with the appropriate filters already in place. –  Michael Mior Oct 24 '11 at 19:31
    
@DwB Thanks. I should add the data were shipped to me on 12 CDs from the US Government's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. I do not have control over the production of the input file. And I cannot think of a helpful way to AWK it. Judging from their website, HCUP made the data files with mainly SAS users in mind. I am trying to create an efficient workflow for analyzing with R, backed by MySQL. –  jthetzel Oct 24 '11 at 19:33
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it possible to modify the LOAD DATA INFILE statement to skip the row if

No. There is an IGNORE option. However it use line numbers not inline logical comparisons.

would this be significantly faster than my current DELETE and OPTIMIZE method

Likely. But, as it's not an option, it doesn't matter.

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Thanks. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't overlooking something clever. –  jthetzel Oct 24 '11 at 19:49
    
I don't think so. Would be a potentially useful feature though. –  Jason McCreary Oct 24 '11 at 19:52
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I guess, if you can use a unique key on your diagnostic codes, say key dc(c1,c2,c3) and use the load data infile file_name ignore into table option, all your unique key duplicates will be ignored. So, you are left with only one combination of codes that are '','',''. All the rest will be ignored. But, this will obviously consume more resources than the simple infile but should be faster than deleting afterwards. Also, I think it could be better if all your diagnostic codes are ints, this would store '0' for blanks and when there is a duplicate entry attempt, mysql should more quickly recognize an integer than a string.

I also suggest you don't use 'local' infile unless you are at a client.

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