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I know that getenv() returns a value of specified environment variable of the current user, but my code requires root privileges so getenv() would only use the sudo environment variables. I also know that SUDO_USER tells which user is invoking sudo, which is the user environment I want use for getenv().

char* gnome_env_var = getenv("GDMSESSION"); //returns null as not found in sudo env
char* usr = getenv("SUDO_USER");

Is there a way I can get the value of an environment variable for the logged in user, not the sudo environment?

EDIT Okay, so what I'm hearing is that the set of environment variables are unique to each process, not user and using sudo to invoke a process with root privileges calls execve which can create an entirely new set of environment variables for that process. So to rephrase, is there a way besides messing with the sudoers file, and within the current process, of finding the calling process's environment variables?

I particularly need the GDMSession environment variable.

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Welcome to Stack Overflow. You've already gotten answers to your original question. What you should do is accept an answer that explains why what you wanted to do isn't possible. Then post a new question asking about what you really wanted, which was to get your calling process's value. (You might get the same bad news in that question, too, but at least anyone else looking for the answer later will find it attached to the relevant question.) You're allowed to post as many questions as you want, so don't try to fit them all into a single post. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 24 '11 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

getenv doesn't tell you about the environment variables of the current user, but the current process. Users are free to have as many environments as they want(and can create processes), for example with the export shell built-in. In every call to execve, the calling program is free to create an entirely new environment for the executed process.

Therefore, there is no way to get the environment variables of the user, or even those of the process executing sudo. Why do you want that anyways?

You can, however, configure sudo to keep some or all environment variables, via the keep_env and reset_env directives in /etc/sudoers.

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Might be looking for something like this: serverfault.com/questions/66363/… –  Fred Larson Oct 24 '11 at 19:48
    
Well, you could delve into /proc/X/environ (for login shell, or whatever), but it's probably a silly thing to do, anyway. –  Cat Plus Plus Oct 24 '11 at 19:48
    
@Cat Plus Plus: I won't argue with that. –  Fred Larson Oct 24 '11 at 19:50
    
"[not] the current user, but the current session." Close, but no cigar. getenv reports the environment of the current process. –  Robᵩ Oct 24 '11 at 19:51
    
@Rob Already fixed. I wanted to invoke the image of a shell that keeps the variables, but that image is just wrong and more complicated than reality. –  phihag Oct 24 '11 at 19:53

There isn't a "user environment." Every process has its own copy of the environment variables. They don't even automatically inherit -- that they appear to is an illusion maintained by the shell and the C library. It is more accurate to think of them as a second set of command line arguments to every program.

So before we can answer your question, you need to clear up what you mean! There are possibilities - none of them are elegant, mind, but they do exist - but they depend crucially on which environment variable you want to get at in which process's state and why.

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Okay, so what I'm hearing is that the set of environment variables are unique to each process, not user and using sudo to invoke a process with root privileges calls execve which can create an entirely new set of environment variables for that process. So to rephrase, is there a way besides messing with the sudoers file, and within the current process, of finding the calling process's environment variables? –  P4L Oct 24 '11 at 20:17
    
Yes. The general answer -- hinted at in comments on @phihag's answer -- is to dig through /proc/${getppid()}/environ. However, this is Linux-specific, and not guaranteed to work (you might have gotten reparented to init(8); the parent process may have overwritten the memory region that the kernel reads out of when you open that file). You want GDMSESSION. What do you want it for? There might be a better answer. –  Zack Oct 24 '11 at 20:30
    
I wanted to see if the Desktop Environment was Gnome or Unity. Thanks for your help, I'll do some more self-research from here on out. –  P4L Oct 24 '11 at 20:59

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