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If I have a Guava Multimap, how would I sort the entries based on the number of values for the given key?

For instance:

Multimap<String, String> multiMap = ArrayListMultimap.create();
multiMap.put("foo", "1");
multiMap.put("bar", "2");
multiMap.put("bar", "3");
multiMap.put("bar", "99");

Given this, when iterating over multiMap, how would I get the "bar" entries to come first (since "bar" has 3 values vs. only 1 for "foo")?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Extract the entries in a list, then sort the list :

List<Map.Entry<String, String>> entries = new ArrayList<Map.Entry<String, String>>(map.entries());
Collections.sort(entries, new Comparator<Map.Entry<String, String>>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Map.Entry<String, String> e1, Map.Entry<String, String> e2) {
        return Ints.compare(map.get(e2.getKey()).size(), map.get(e1.getKey()).size());
    }
});

Then iterate over the entries.

Edit :

If what you want is in fact iterate over the entries of the inner map (Entry<String, Collection<String>>), then do the following :

List<Map.Entry<String, Collection<String>>> entries = 
    new ArrayList<Map.Entry<String, Collection<String>>>(map.asMap().entrySet());
Collections.sort(entries, new Comparator<Map.Entry<String, Collection<String>>>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Map.Entry<String, Collection<String>> e1, 
                       Map.Entry<String, Collection<String>> e2) {
        return Ints.compare(e2.getValue().size(), e1.getValue().size());
    }
});

// and now iterate
for (Map.Entry<String, Collection<String>> entry : entries) {
    System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey());
    for (String value : entry.getValue()) {
        System.out.println("    Value = " + value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That will sort the entries individually, but now I no longer have a Multimap, just a list of Map.Entry objects. So I have lost the grouping of values to a single key. What I want is to keep the Multimap, but just reorder the elements so that they are in descending order based on number of values. –  Jeff Olson Oct 24 '11 at 21:25
    
You said you wanted to iterate over the entries. You have a list of entries. Iterate over these entries. The MultiMap is still there, untouched. A MultiMap is not ordered, and certainly not by the number of values for a given key. –  JB Nizet Oct 24 '11 at 21:31
    
Sorry my original question was not quite clear. I want to be able to iterate over the original Multimap, but get the highest count entries first. Also, a TreeMultimap has sorted keys (and values), so it's not necessarily accurate to say that a Multimap is not ordered. –  Jeff Olson Oct 24 '11 at 21:56
    
That's what my code does : it gives you a list of entries of the multimap to iterate over, with the highest count entries first. A MultiMap can be ordered, but the order can't change each time a value is added or removed from the map. The keys can be sorted by an instrinsic, immutable property. –  JB Nizet Oct 24 '11 at 22:00
    
eneveu's answer is doing what I want: a new Multimap that is sorted in the "descending by count per key" order. This then allows me to iterate over the Multimap using asMap().entrySet() and get each entry, print the key, and then iterate over the values with a for loop and print each one. –  Jeff Olson Oct 25 '11 at 16:41
show 4 more comments

I'd use the Multimap's keys Multiset entries, sort them by descending frequency (which will be easier once the functionality described in issue 356 is added to Guava), and build a new Multimap by iterating the sorted keys, getting values from the original Multimap:

/**
 * @return a {@link Multimap} whose entries are sorted by descending frequency
 */
public Multimap<String, String> sortedByDescendingFrequency(Multimap<String, String> multimap) {
    // ImmutableMultimap.Builder preserves key/value order
    ImmutableMultimap.Builder<String, String> result = ImmutableMultimap.builder();
    for (Multiset.Entry<String> entry : DESCENDING_COUNT_ORDERING.sortedCopy(multimap.keys().entrySet())) {
        result.putAll(entry.getElement(), multimap.get(entry.getElement()));
    }
    return result.build();
}

/**
 * An {@link Ordering} that orders {@link Multiset.Entry Multiset entries} by ascending count.
 */
private static final Ordering<Multiset.Entry<?>> ASCENDING_COUNT_ORDERING = new Ordering<Multiset.Entry<?>>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Multiset.Entry<?> left, Multiset.Entry<?> right) {
        return Ints.compare(left.getCount(), right.getCount());
    }
};

/**
 * An {@link Ordering} that orders {@link Multiset.Entry Multiset entries} by descending count.
 */
private static final Ordering<Multiset.Entry<?>> DESCENDING_COUNT_ORDERING = ASCENDING_COUNT_ORDERING.reverse();

EDIT: THIS DOESN'T WORK IF SOME ENTRIES HAVE THE SAME FREQUENCY (see my comment)

Another approach, using an Ordering based on the Multimaps' keys Multiset, and ImmutableMultimap.Builder.orderKeysBy():

/**
 * @return a {@link Multimap} whose entries are sorted by descending frequency
 */
public Multimap<String, String> sortedByDescendingFrequency(Multimap<String, String> multimap) {
    return ImmutableMultimap.<String, String>builder()
            .orderKeysBy(descendingCountOrdering(multimap.keys()))
            .putAll(multimap)
            .build();
}

private static Ordering<String> descendingCountOrdering(final Multiset<String> multiset) {
    return new Ordering<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String left, String right) {
            return Ints.compare(multiset.count(left), multiset.count(right));
        }
    };
}

Second approach is shorter, but I don't like the fact that the Ordering has state (it depends on the Multimap's key Multiset to compare keys).

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3  
Thank you! The first approach worked great, exactly what I wanted. Something is wrong with the second approach, though (haven't debugged it to figure out what yet...but with my test data I start with an input Multimap whose asMap() has size 432, but the output Multimap's asMap() size is only 21. –  Jeff Olson Oct 25 '11 at 16:39
    
That's indeed weird. I'm going to test it when I can find some time. I might have made a mistake. You sure you aren't comparing inputMultimap.size() with outputMultimap.asMap().size()? –  Etienne Neveu Oct 25 '11 at 21:36
    
Correct, I was comparing asMap().size() on both. –  Jeff Olson Oct 27 '11 at 2:33
    
I revisited this, and I found why the second approach doesn't work. When you use ImmutableMultimap.Builder#orderKeysBy(), the builder creates a TreeMap under the hood, which uses the given comparator to sort its keys. When two keys are equal according to the comparator, only the first is added to the map. In your case, you had 432 entries, but only 21 different "frequencies" for those entries. –  Etienne Neveu Mar 23 '12 at 21:29
    
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks for the update. –  Jeff Olson Mar 24 '12 at 1:58
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