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I have a table that has a column 'Value' that is a varchar. One row puts a '10' in this column. This "number" will need to be added and substracted to, but I can do so directly b/c its a varchar. So, the following gives an error:

update Fields  
set Value = Value - 1
from Fields f, FTypes ft
where ft.Name = 'Field Count'
    and ft.ID = f.ID_FT
    and f.ID_Project = 186              

GO

How do I cast/convert the value to an int, perform the math, then set as a varchar again?

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Post the error message. –  JNK Oct 24 '11 at 20:41
2  
Have you tried putting your question's title into google? The first few results provide very good answers to your question. –  ObscureRobot Oct 24 '11 at 20:41
    
The error message is irrelevant. The problem was clearly stated in the post. –  BladeHal Oct 26 '11 at 11:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Martin Smith's point is an excellent one --> If it is only numeric data going in there and you are always going to be doing operations like this, it will save you time and hassle not having to do this conversion work.

That being said you can do -

update Fields  
set ColumnName = cast( (cast(ColumnName as int) - 1) as varchar(nn))
from Fields f, FTypes ft
where ft.Name = 'Field Count'
    and ft.ID = f.ID_FT
    and f.ID_Project = 186   

where nn is the original definition of your varchar column

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Martin Smith's original point disappeared but it was - Why don't you just store the column as an INT to begin with.. So if the column is used as an INT always, avoid implicit conversions, avoid the need to explicitly convert and just go with INT... –  Mike Walsh Oct 24 '11 at 20:44
    
I was going to say this exact thing, but I'm kind of slow answering :P It's a good point. –  Brandon Buck Oct 24 '11 at 20:45
1  
@Mike - I deleted the comment you refer to as I'm guessing from the table names this is some sort of EAV structure (and whilst I'm not a fan of it myself debating the merits of it here would be off topic) –  Martin Smith Oct 24 '11 at 20:45
    
Ahh sure. The EAV pattern isn't all evil but I hear you :-) I had assumed that the OP was just hiding their actual column names but now that I look at the example again, I see what you are saying. So @BladeHal - if you are using an EAV pattern the conversion works. You could also consider holding int values in one table, "string" values in another, etc. that presents other issues too but if you are doing calculations and work that prefers native INT data type, the cost of the table per data type approach may be worth it. Something to try for yourself and see though. –  Mike Walsh Oct 24 '11 at 20:49

You need to use CAST twice - once to make your Value column an INT so you can subtract 1 from it, and then back to a VARCHAR(x):

update dbo.Fields  
set Value = CAST((CAST(Value AS INT) - 1) AS VARCHAR(20))
from dbo.Fields f
inner join dbo.FTypes ft ON ft.ID = f.ID_FT
where ft.Name = 'Field Count'
    and f.ID_Project = 186      

Also, I would recommend using the dbo. prefix always, on all your database objects, and I would always argue for the new, ANSI standard JOIN syntax which is more expressive (clearer to read and understand) and helps avoid unwanted cartesian products (by forgetting to specify a JOIN condition in the WHERE clause....)

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1  
+1 on the ANSI Join syntax. Also not a bad idea for schema qualifying object names. –  Mike Walsh Oct 24 '11 at 20:53

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