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I need to get the natural log of a number (between 0 and 1) in C. But the natural log function in C gives an undefined error if the result is negative.

What is the way around this?

EDIT: Sorry folks , my code had flipped the input and output , and I wasn't able to spot it , thanks for the quick help, sorry for my obvious stupidity!

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closed as too localized by Johnsyweb, Oliver Charlesworth, jk., AakashM, interjay Oct 25 '11 at 9:59

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3  
Do you have code exhibiting the problem? –  evil otto Oct 24 '11 at 21:17
3  
Please show us your code. –  SLaks Oct 24 '11 at 21:18
1  
Can you show example code? It would be rather strange behaviour if log gave an error for values in the range (0, 1). –  Mark Dickinson Oct 24 '11 at 21:19
    
undefined error? How does it give it to you? Is it when you run the program or when you compile it? Show your code? –  MK. Oct 24 '11 at 21:20
    
EDIT: Sorry folks , my code had flipped the input and output , and I wasn't able to spot it , thanks for the quick help, sorry for my obvious stupidity! –  user1011689 Oct 24 '11 at 21:26

5 Answers 5

No it doesn't. It gives an error (or rather, returns NaN) if the input is negative. The standard library log function works perfectly for inputs between zero and one.

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EDIT: Sorry folks , my code had flipped the input and output , and I wasn't able to spot it , thanks for the quick help, sorry for my obvious stupidity! –  user1011689 Oct 24 '11 at 21:28

Logarithms don't have a real solution (using real in its mathematical sense) for negative numbers: the log of a negative number is a complex value, which cannot be represented by a C double. So the standard library won't give a result for this: you'll need to find a complex maths library or write your own complex log function.

Edit: most readers will have noticed, I hope, that I have (perhaps wrongly!) assumed that the OP means that the error occurs when the input is negative, not the result!

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EDIT: Sorry folks , my code had flipped the input and output , and I wasn't able to spot it , thanks for the quick help, sorry for my obvious stupidity! –  user1011689 Oct 24 '11 at 21:29

Do you mean if the result is negative, or the input? log() should have no trouble returning negative results. Show your code and output.

If you mean the input is negative, test that your input is greater than zero before calling log(). There's no sensible answer to the log of zero or negative numbers.

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EDIT: Sorry folks , my code had flipped the input and output , and I wasn't able to spot it , thanks for the quick help, sorry for my obvious stupidity! –  user1011689 Oct 24 '11 at 21:30

I suspect you mean that the error happens when you compile the program? Then make sure that you add

#include <math.h>

and then add -lm when compiling.

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How do you detect the error?

None of the standard C library functions sets errno to zero, so if you want to detect an error, you have to do something like:

errno = 0;
double d = log(0.25);
if (errno != 0)
    ...handle error...

If you don't set errno to 0, you may get any left-over value from any previous system call.

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EDIT: Sorry folks , my code had flipped the input and output , and I wasn't able to spot it , thanks for the quick help, sorry for my obvious stupidity! –  user1011689 Oct 24 '11 at 21:27

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