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When I try to use os.system to open a file in appdata it doesnt work. Can anyone explain this? This is the code

os.system('C:\Users\%s\appdata\LocalHigh\%s'%(user,filename))
#os has been imported before and the variables have been defined.
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closed as not a real question by larsmans, JBernardo, Book Of Zeus, VMAtm, James Johnson Oct 25 '11 at 20:54

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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How about an error message? How am I supposed to help you when I don't know (a) what you want to happen or (b) what actually did happen. –  Moe Oct 24 '11 at 22:04

3 Answers 3

From: http://docs.python.org/reference/lexical_analysis.html

String literals may optionally be prefixed with a letter 'r' or 'R'; such strings are called raw strings and use different rules for interpreting backslash escape sequences.

Sample: r'C:\Process new\RF\test.dat'

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os.system isn't for opening files. It's for executing programs. Files are opened with open or file. If executing a program is what you wanted to do, then please post the values of user and filename and the exception you got.

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I tried this on my system and it worked fine.

Did you make sure that user and filename are valid strings?

Also, like larsmans said - os.system is used to execute programs and not to open files.

To open files you need to use: open(filename, mode).

Put the full path to the file in filename - in your case: 'C:\Users\%s\appdata\LocalHigh\%s'%(user,filename)

mode is one of 'r'/'w'/'a' for reading, (over)writing and appending respectively.

See more information in: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/inputoutput.html

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That is what I meant, executing files was the intent –  Justin Gardner Oct 24 '11 at 22:22

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