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JavaScript supports a goto like syntax for breaking out of nested loops. It's not a great idea in general, but it's considered acceptable practice. C# does not directly support the break labelName syntax...but it does support the infamous goto.

I believe the equivalent can be achieved in C#:

    int i = 0;            
    while(i <= 10)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(i);
        i++;
        for(int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
            if (i > 5)
            {
                goto Break;//break out of all loops
            }
    }

    Break:

By the same logic of JavaScript, is nested loop scenario an acceptable usage of goto? Otherwise, the only way I am aware to achieve this functionality is by setting a bool with appropriate scope.

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Don't do that. use a bool. –  Dani Oct 24 '11 at 21:55
4  
As always: xkcd.com/292 –  George Duckett Oct 24 '11 at 21:59
    
possible duplicate of Can I use break to exit multiple nested for loops? –  Henk Holterman Oct 24 '11 at 22:00
1  
I found this interesting article - I've never used a goto in C# myself, but I like this guy's perspective. weblogs.asp.net/stevewellens/archive/2009/06/01/… It describes our reactions to such sacrilegious ideas as (gasp) goto statements in C# pretty accurately. –  David Stratton Oct 24 '11 at 22:01
2  
@Dani Have you got any reason for that other than repeating what everyone else says is 'correct'? –  Rob Oct 24 '11 at 22:14
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9 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

My opinion: complex code flows with nested loops are hard to reason about; branching around, whether it is with goto or break, just makes it harder. Rather than writing the goto, I would first think really hard about whether there is a way to eliminate the nested loops.

A couple of useful techniques:

First technique: Refactor the inner loop to a method. Have the method return whether or not to break out of the outer loop. So:

for(outer blah blah blah)
{
    for(inner blah blah blah)
    {
        if (whatever)
        {
             goto leaveloop;      
        }
    }
}
leaveloop:    
...

becomes

for(outer blah blah blah)
{
    if (Inner(blah blah blah))
        break;
}

...

bool Inner(blah blah blah)
{
    for(inner blah blah blah)
    {
        if (whatever)
        {
             return true;      
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Second technique: if the loops do not have side effects, use LINQ.

// fulfill the first unfulfilled order over $100
foreach(var customer in customers)
{
    foreach(var order in customer.Orders)
    {
        if (!order.Filled && order.Total >= 100.00m)
        {
             Fill(order);
             goto leaveloop;      
        }
    }
}
leaveloop:    

instead, write:

var orders = from customer in customers
             from order in customer.Orders;
             where !order.Filled
             where order.Total >= 100.00m
             select order;
var orderToFill = orders.FirstOrDefault();
if (orderToFill != null) Fill(orderToFill);

No loops, so no breaking out required.

Alternatively, as configurator points out in a comment, you could write the code in this form:

var orderToFill = customers
    .SelectMany(customer=>customer.Orders)
    .Where(order=>!order.Filled)
    .Where(order=>order.Total >= 100.00m)
    .FirstOrDefault();
if (orderToFill != null) Fill(orderToFill);

The moral of the story: loops emphasize control flow at the expense of business logic. Rather than trying to pile more and more complex control flow on top of each other, try refactoring the code so that the business logic is clear.

share|improve this answer
    
For your customer.Orders example, I would use SelectMany, as in foreach (var order in customers.SelectMany(c => c.Orders)) { ... }, which would change very little code, and reduce the nested clauses into one foreach. –  configurator Oct 25 '11 at 18:12
    
Sometimes, the check/method is very simple and just requires one line. I would use 'gotos' in that instance, it's too much messing around. –  gladsocc Oct 31 '11 at 11:33
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I would personally try to avoid using goto here by simply putting the loop into a different method - while you can't easily break out of a particular level of loop, you can easily return from a method at any point.

In my experience this approach has usually led to simpler and more readable code with shorter methods (doing one particular job) in general.

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try sounds too soft to me. In my experience, what you describe is always possible and desirable. –  Sjoerd Oct 24 '11 at 22:24
1  
@Sjoerd: I disagree. Sometimes putting the loop into a different method just ends up making the code that much harder to read. In particular, this will make the code harder to follow if the inner loop has no meaning when considered independent of the outer loop. Then you end up with "LoopFunc" and "LoopFuncHelper." –  Brian Oct 25 '11 at 13:05
    
@Brian Then your loops are too complicated and should be refactored. See Eric Lippert's post for how to solve that case in C#. –  Sjoerd Oct 25 '11 at 13:57
    
@Sjoerd: Actually, I was talking about the case where your loops were simple but needed to break out. It's perfectly possible that you have a nested loop that has only one concern rather than two concerns that can be separated. I suspect anti-goto users (such as yourself; you did say goto is unacceptable) would respond by either using a bool or by refactoring anyhow. If the business logic is inherently representable as a nested loop that can be broken out in the middle, I don't like the idea of wrapping a code in a function. Then, the only benefit is to replace goto with return. –  Brian Oct 25 '11 at 14:11
    
@Brian As return is much more limited in power than goto, I consider that a huge benefit! When encountering a return, you know exactly where it leads without reading any other part of the code. When encountering a goto, one has to search as there is not even an indication whether it jumps forward or backwards. When encountering a label, one has to search which gotos jump to this place. That mental difference is huge when reading code. –  Sjoerd Oct 25 '11 at 14:26
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Let's get one thing straight: there is nothing fundamentally wrong with using the goto statement, it isn't evil - it is just one more tool in the toolbox. It is how you use it that really matters, and it is easily misused.

Breaking out of a nested loop of some description can be a valid use of the statement, although you should first look to see if it can be redesigned. Can your loop exit expressions be rewritten? Are you using the appropriate type of loop? Can you filter the list of data you may be iterating over so that you don't need to exit early? Should you refactor some loop code into a separate function?

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IMO it is acceptable in languages that do not support break n; where n specifies the number of loops it should break out.
At least it's much more readable than setting a variable that is then checked in the outer loop.

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I believe the 'goto' is acceptable in this situation. C# does not support any nifty ways to break out of nested loops unfortunately.

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return will break out of nested loops. And see the top answers for suggestions for rewrite to improve code readability (and 'accidently' avoiding the goto at the same time). –  Sjoerd Oct 24 '11 at 23:05
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It's a bit of a unacceptable practice in C#. If there's no way your design can avoid it, well, gotta use it. But do exhaust all other alternatives first. It will make for better readability and maintainability. For your example, I've crafted one such potential refactoring:

void Original()
{
    int i = 0;            
    while(i <= 10)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(i);
        i++;
        if (Process(i))
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}

bool Process(int i)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
        if (i > 5)
        {
            return true;
        }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
sigh here we go again. Any explanation for the downvote, downvoter? –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 24 '11 at 22:24
    
see the discussion on my answer. "Unacceptable" is an unacceptable answer to some people. –  Sjoerd Oct 24 '11 at 22:34
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Unacceptable in C#.

Just wrap the loop in a function and use return.

EDIT: On SO, downvoting is used to on incorrect answers, and not on answers you disagree with. As the OP explicitly asked "is it acceptable?", answering "unacceptable" is not incorrect (although you might disagree).

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2  
The language supports it. In this sense, it's certainly not unacceptable. By what basis is something "acceptable" or "unacceptable" to you? –  Andrew Flanagan Oct 24 '11 at 22:00
1  
Unacceptable? Never seen a need for one, but "unacceptable" is too much. –  Alexei Levenkov Oct 24 '11 at 22:08
3  
@Sjoerd - read “Considered Harmful” Essays Considered Harmful –  Henk Holterman Oct 24 '11 at 22:13
2  
@Rob So we disagree. But it's a valid answer to the question, and there is a reason. Therefor: no need to downvote. –  Sjoerd Oct 24 '11 at 22:26
1  
@Sjoerd You gave an alternative implementation, not a reason why it's better, or why goto shouldn't be used. –  Rob Oct 24 '11 at 22:30
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int i = 0;                 
while(i <= 10)     
{         
    Debug.WriteLine(i);         
    i++;         
    for(int j = 0; j < 3 && i <= 5; j++)             
    {
        //Whatever you want to do
    }
 }      
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I recommend using continue if you want to skip that one item, and break if you want to exit the loop. For deeper nested put it in a method and use return. I personally would rather use a status bool than a goto. Rather use goto as a last resort.

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