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I have to say this question is hard to phrase.

So, here is what I have - a table(TAX_A, TAX_B... are not constants; the number of records is practically limited to 4, but can be as little as none, in which case the 8 columns should have NULL values):

tax_name        tax_amount
TAX_A              58.39 
TAX_B              151.81
TAX_C              78.00 
...

and this is what the end result should look like:

tax_name1  tax_amount1  tax_name2  tax_amount2  tax_name2  tax_amount2
    TAX_A      58.39        TAX_B      151.81       TAX_C      78.00

I was thinking to use a PIVOT at first, but then I am not sure how to deal with the second column as I want to move the values in pairs(name, amount).

Please, advise. How can it be done in SQL?

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1 Answer 1

It's a called a table rotation. You need to know the number of columns in the result set.

Given your table specification, the following will work:

select tax_name1 = t1.tax_name , tax_amount1 = t1.tax_amount ,
       tax_name2 = t2.tax_name , tax_amount2 = t2.tax_amount ,
       tax_name3 = t3.tax_name , tax_amount3 = t3.tax_amount ,
       tax_name4 = t4.tax_name , tax_amount4 = t4.tax_amount
from      foo  t1
full join foo  t2 on t2.tax_name = 'TAX_B'
full join foo  t3 on t3.tax_name = 'TAX_C'
full join foo  t4 on t4.tax_name = 'TAX_D'
where t1.tax_name = 'TAX_A'

In a more "real world" scenario, the first table would be to select the distinct set of identifiers for the rows you want in the result set, and then do left self-joins against each "iteration", something like:

select t.id ,
       tax_name1 = t1.tax_name , tax_amount1 = t1.tax_amount ,
       tax_name2 = t2.tax_name , tax_amount2 = t2.tax_amount ,
       tax_name3 = t3.tax_name , tax_amount3 = t3.tax_amount ,
       tax_name4 = t4.tax_name , tax_amount4 = t4.tax_amount
from (select distinct id from foo ) t
left join foo  t1 on t1.id = t.id and t1.tax_name = 'TAX_A'
left join foo  t2 on t2.id = t.id and t2.tax_name = 'TAX_B'
left join foo  t3 on t3.id = t.id and t3.tax_name = 'TAX_C'
left join foo  t4 on t4.id = t.id and t4.tax_name = 'TAX_D'

Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I was not clear enough. TAX_A, TAX_B... are not constants. It is just the set of practically limited to 4, but the values differ. (this is subquery of much larger one). –  Andrei Oct 25 '11 at 14:09
    
It's OK if they're not constant values: you just need a way to filter each self-join so as to only include the desired rows for that self-join. Another approach that sometimes works is to use GROUP BY with an aggregate function for each column, containing around case expressions that distinguish the values for each column. In either case, you still need a way to map row identity to column identity. –  Nicholas Carey Oct 25 '11 at 16:36

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