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Running this batch file

@echo off
set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
if 1 == 1 (
    set PATH=%a%
)

gives inside was unexpected at this time. error.

How to escape a variable to avoid this error?

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migrated from superuser.com Oct 24 '11 at 23:35

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use two different ways

Use the extended syntax of set with quotes set "var=content" will set var with content, content is quoted so special characters aren't problematic and it uses the content till the last quote (without the quote itself)

@echo off
set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
if 1 == 1 (
    set "PATH=%a%"
)

Use delayed expansion (like the answer of shf301) but also transfer the value to the main scope.

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
if 1 == 1 (
    set "localScope_PATH=!a!"
    rem now transfer it to the global scope
    FOR /F "delims=" %%A in ("!localScope_PATH!") DO (
       endlocal
       set "path=%%A"
    )
)

In this case the extended set-syntax is not necessary, I used it only to avoid hidden spaces at the line end.

EDIT: Can I combine this with setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion and using ! instead of % to lazy evaluate variable's value? When I tried I got )! was unexpected at this time.

You can, but it's contra productive, as

@echo off
Setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
if 1 == 1 (
    set PATH=!a:^)=^^^)!
    set path
)

Then your path contains carets in front of the ) like C:\programs (x86^)

To understand how expansion works you can read SO:How does the Windows Command Interpreter (CMD.EXE) parse scripts?

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set "var=content" - who could have guessed? :) –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 26 '11 at 7:32
    
In this case the extended set-syntax is not necessary Could You explain? –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 29 '11 at 17:36
    
I prefer it, as it avoid problems with hidden spaces at the line end –  jeb Oct 29 '11 at 18:40
    
I was asking why it's not necessary not what was the reason You used it :) –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 29 '11 at 19:16
    
btw, could I somehow contact You? –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 29 '11 at 19:48

Using delayed expansion will fix that:

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
if 1 == 1 (
    set PATH=!a!
)

Without delayed expansion the if block (from the if to the ending ), %a% is replaced first and then the block is parsed and run. With delayed expansion !a! isn't expanded after the block parsed. So the parsing logic won't see the ) in a and won't cause it issues.

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Well, you modified local PATH variable. How are you going to transfer this value to global scope? –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 24 '11 at 23:32
    
In my answer is a sample to transfer variables to global scope –  jeb Oct 25 '11 at 8:23

The ) in %a% is the problem here. You can just do some substitution to escape the ).

@echo off
set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
if 1 == 1 (
    set PATH=%a:)=^)%
)
share|improve this answer
    
Can I combine this with setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion and using ! instead of % to lazy evaluate variable's value? When I tried I got )! was unexpected at this time. error. –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 25 '11 at 5:22
    
You can combine it, but it's not necessary as delayed expansion is safe against any special characters, also ) –  jeb Oct 25 '11 at 8:09
    
I would use either delayed expansion or my method, not both. Just an opinion. –  Patrick S. Oct 25 '11 at 10:26

Brackets and variables are always a pain to mix. Use a subroutine instead.

@Echo Off
Set a=some value with (parentheses) inside
If 1 == 1 Call :SetPath
Echo %Path%
Exit /B

:SetPath
Set "Path=%a%"
SetX "Path" "%a%"
Exit /B

I set the variable twice, once using Set for the current shell session, and one using SetX to set it system-wide for future shell sessions. Remove either if they're unneeded.

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