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I found this code in a book and I executed it in Netbeans:

boolean b = false;
if(b = true) {
    System.out.println("true");
} else {
    System.out.println("false");
}

I just don't understand why the output of this code is true, Can anyone enlighten me please, Thanks.

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14  
= !=​​​​​​ == –  SLaks Oct 25 '11 at 0:44
7  
This code also demonstrates why testing booleans for equality with true or false is not only pointless but dangerous. –  EJP Oct 25 '11 at 1:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's missing the double-equals. So it's doing an assignment instead of an equality comparison (and remember, the return value of an assignment is the new value). In most cases, the fact that most types are not boolean means the result is not a boolean and so it becomes illegal for an if statement, resulting in a compiler error. However, since the type here is already a boolean, the assignment results in a boolean and so the safety-check fails. Thus, b = true means that b is assigned the value true and this is the value that is returned and checked by the if statement.

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This is because the if-statement condition isn't a comparison. It's an assignment:

if(b = true)

Which will always return true. So it will always print true.

If you wanted to do a comparison, you need to use ==.

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1  
If you aren't getting a warning about this, your compiler/ide warning settings need to be cranked up. –  Ted Hopp Oct 25 '11 at 0:50
    
this answer is wrong? im getting false if(b=false) (as in purposeful assignment) like logically toggling b=true;return b=false –  Nik Nov 4 at 19:47
    
@Nik Generally speaking, you shouldn't be trying to write cryptic code like that. While it may be convenient for you, it could easily confuse the next person trying to read your code. –  Mysticial Nov 4 at 19:55
    
if it's commented and goes with the style, i dont see a problem. verbose code is not always good..... think if you have a lot of specialized calculations for something that needs to be really fast. i was just surprised to see a test case fail –  Nik Nov 4 at 22:22
    
@Nik Please understand that shorter != faster. Also we're getting off-topic here. What does this have to do with my answer? –  Mysticial Nov 4 at 22:30
 if(b = true)

Well it is true because = is the assignment operator and not the equality operator ==

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In your "if" statement you are assigning the value "true" to b. You should check the value by using the comparison operator "==".

boolean b = false;

if(b == true)
{
   System.out.println("true");
}
else
{
   System.out.println("false");
}
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if (b = true) assigns the value true to b, and then acts on that true value. That's the danger of C-like languages, that if you leave out the second = when you meant to compare, you get an assignment instead, and an unexpected result.

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It is because it is an assignment. You don't do a check on b, you just assign true to it.

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Think of int x having 2 possible values, either 1 or 0. If x = 1, then do this. Else, (x = 0) then do something else. Boolean is just saying it is either one condition, or not that condition.

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