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which of the following is an efficient way to reverse words in a string ?

public String Reverse(StringTokenizer st){
    String[] words = new String[st.countTokens()];
    int i = 0;
    while(st.hasMoreTokens()){
       words[i] = st.nextToken();i++}

    for(int j = words.length-1;j--)
       output = words[j]+" ";}

OR

public String Reverse(StringTokenizer st, String output){        
    if(!st.hasMoreTokens()) return output;        
        output = st.nextToken()+" "+output;
        return Reverse(st, output);}       

public String ReverseMain(StringTokenizer st){       
    return Reverse(st, "");}

while the first way seems more readable and straight forward, there are two loops in it. In the 2nd method, I've tried doing it in tail-recursive way. But I am not sure whether java does optimize tail-recursive code.

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1  
Best way to find out would be to profile the code and see which runs faster. –  NickLH Oct 25 '11 at 2:39
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/771092/… –  paxdiablo Oct 25 '11 at 2:41
    
StringTokenizer is not deprecated but ... StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead. (from the java docs) –  Brian Roach Oct 25 '11 at 2:44
    
If you are worried about speed, you can use split, or indexOf() to break up the String and use StringBuilder to create the reversed words. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 25 '11 at 7:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you could do this in just one loop

public String Reverse(StringTokenizer st){
    int length = st.countTokens();
    String[] words = new String[length];
    int i = length - 1;
    while(i >= 0){
      words[i] = st.nextToken();i--}
}
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But I am not sure whether java does optimize tail-recursive code.

It doesn't. Or at least the Sun/Oracle Java implementations don't, up to and including Java 7.

References:


I don't know whether this makes one solution faster than the other. (Test it yourself ... taking care to avoid the standard micro-benchmarking traps.)

However, the fact that Java doesn't implement tail-call optimization means that the 2nd solution is liable to run out of stack space if you give it a string with a large (enough) number of words.


Finally, if you are looking for a more space efficient way to implement this, there is clever way that uses just a StringBuilder.

  1. Create a StringBuilder from your input String
  2. Reverse the characters in the StringBuilder using reverse().
  3. Step through the StringBuilder, identifying the start and end offset of each word. For each start/end offset pair, reverse the characters between the offsets. (You have to do this using a loop.)
  4. Turn the StringBuilder back into a String.
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so the second solution is risky then, I see so what exactly is the use of recursion then? Is it useful only when we are sure that the input to the recursive method will not exceed certain limit so as to cause stack overflow ? So, there is no point making your recusive calls tail-recursive if you are programing in java ?Is tail recursive mostly useful for functional languages only ?...Thanks –  comatose Oct 25 '11 at 3:01
    
You always need to be a bit careful when using recursion in Java, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't use it at all. For instance, if you know beforehand that the input data structure size / shape places reasonable bounds on the amount of recursion, it is just fine. It is also possible that future Java implementations will incorporate tail-call optimization. But, yes, transforming your code into tail-recursive won't improve performance with current generation Java. –  Stephen C Oct 25 '11 at 3:07

You can test results by timing both of them on a large amount of results

eg. You reverse 100000000 strings and see how many seconds it takes. You could also compare start and end system timestamps to get the exact difference between the two functions.

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StringTokenizer is not deprecated but if you read the current JavaDoc...

StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead.

String[] strArray = str.split(" ");
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = strArray.length() - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    sb.append(strArray[i]).append(" ");

String reversedWords = sb.substring(0, sb.length -1) // strip trailing space 
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