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I have the following example classes in Java:

public class A { }

public class Super {
    protected Super() { }
    public Super(A a) { }
}

public class Sub extends Super { }

public class Consumer {
    public Consumer() {
        Sub sub = new Sub(new A()); //compiler error
    }
}

The compiler error states that the arguments cannot be applied to the default constructor in Sub, which is perfectly understandable.

What I'm curious about is the rationale behind this decision. Java generates the default empty constructor in Sub; why can't it call it behind the scenes in this case? Is this primarily a case of sane hand-holding, or is there a technical reason?

EDIT

I'm aware that this is a language limitation. I'm curious about why it is a language limitation.

EDIT 2

It seems that, as is often the case, I was too close to the code I was actually working in to see the big picture. I've posted a counter-example in the answers below that shows why this is a Bad Thing®.

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1  
Here's Jon Skeet's take on it stackoverflow.com/questions/1644317/… –  Jonathan Spooner Oct 25 '11 at 3:13
1  
I'm confused about your edit. You're wondering why, when you call a constructor with one argument, a default constructor with no arguments can't be called in its place? Clearly the programmer wasn't trying to call a constructor that would completely ignore his parameter, otherwise he wouldn't have specifed the parameter! –  Mark Peters Oct 25 '11 at 3:15
1  
There is a difference between "creating a default no-arg constructor" and "creating a shadowing constructor for every constructor in the parent" type. Not really much magic going on as Java just doesn't do it. Nothing about "hand holding", other aspect of Java's [annoyingly] verbose syntax aside ;-) (Constructors are never virtual/overridden.) –  user166390 Oct 25 '11 at 3:23
1  
I'm wondering why the default constructor can't be called for Sub, and have the argument passed on to Super. When I think about it that way, I think this is actually a case that I wouldn't otherwise run into if I didn't have to specify default constructors all the way down to use these classes with GSON. But, in thinking about it, I think I've answered my own question - when Java builds the default constructor in Sub, it automatically includes a call to the default constructor in Super. Therefore, if it were to call into Super(A a) construction would happen twice. –  arootbeer Oct 25 '11 at 3:25
1  
@JonathanSpooner - thanks for the link to Jon's answer, but that's not exactly the same question. –  arootbeer Oct 25 '11 at 3:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it's an issue of both readibility and not assuming intent. You say

Java generates the default empty constructor; why can't it call it behind the scenes in this case?

Yet to me, it would make much more sense for Java to implicitly call the Super(A) constructor "behind the scenes" than to call the Super() constructor, disregarding A.

And there you have it. We already have two disparate assumptions about what should (or could) happen in this case.

One of the Java language's core principles is transparency. As much as possible, the programmer should be able to see by looking at the code what will happen, sometimes at the expense of convenience or magic at the syntax level.

A parallel tenet to that is not assuming intent: in cases where the programmer's intentions seem ambiguous, the Java language will sometimes favour a compile error rather than automatically chosing a default through some (arbitrary or otherwise) selection algorithm.

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Good points, but you seem to have misunderstood my statement. I'll update it to make it more clear. It may not change your argument... –  arootbeer Oct 25 '11 at 3:11
public class Sub extends Super { }

does not have the constructor Sub(A a), it only has the default constructor Sub().

Constructors are not inherited.

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Constructors are inherited which is why it doesn't work. –  mikek3332002 Oct 25 '11 at 2:58
    
@mikek3332002: I think we can only invoke super class constructor from sub class but not inherited. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 25 '11 at 3:17

Base classes need to call super constructors in order to ensure an object is properly instantiated. For instance consider:

class Super {
   final String field1;

   public Super(String field1) {
      this.field1 = field1;
   }
   ...
}


class Base extends Super {
   final String field2;

   public Base(String field2) {
      this.field2 = field2;
   }
   ...
}

Does Base's constructor override the Super constructor? If so, then field1 is no longer guaranteed to be initialized, making inherited methods behave unexpectedly.

The moment you add a non-default constructor to the subclass then inherited constructors stop working. I think it'd be a confusing and rarely useful feature it was added to the language, although technically I can see no reason why it wouldn't be possible.

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The problem with this counter-example is that it does not involve the default constructors. You are correct that this code is problematic; it would not even compile. However, my question is specifically around default constructors. –  arootbeer Oct 25 '11 at 3:14
    
Your example works because Sub has no constructors, and it would be a confusing feature if constructors were inherited only in those cases. –  Garrett Hall Oct 25 '11 at 3:30
    
My example is problematic only because Sub has no constructors. I will agree with you that it would be confusing, but this question is to try to ferret out exactly why it would be confusing. –  arootbeer Oct 25 '11 at 3:34

You've overidden the default public constructor, so there isn't anything to call.

So the class Sub is equivalent to

public class Sub extends Super
{
    protected Sub(){}
    public Sub(A a) { }
}

It would because its

  • Sane behaviour - Behaves as specified by the programmer, and it also follows the concept of inheritance in OOP languages
  • Following its C++ legacy
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I'm putting this out as a technical reason for this behavior; I'm in agreement with several other answers that this could be semantically confusing.

Consider the following example:

public class A { }

public abstract class Super {
    protected Super() {
        // perform time consuming, destructive, or
        // otherwise one-time operations
    }

    public Super(A a) {
        this();
        // perform A-related construction operations
    }
}

public class Sub extends Super { }

public class Consumer {
    public Consumer() {
        Sub sub = new Sub(new A());
    }
}

When the Sub is constructed, in this case the default constructor on Sub would be called, which would chain to the default constructor on Super (because that's the magic the language defines). Then, the call to Super(A) would invoke logic that is designed to be run once, at construction. This is obviously not what the developer intends.

Even without the this() call in the Super(A) constructor, the developer's intention cannot be determined; the constructors may be mutually exclusive for some reason.

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