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I am going through interfaces as defined in the complete reference. I just wanted to understand what the following paragraph mentions about.

"Interfaces are designed to support dynamic method resolution at run time. Normally, in order for a method to be called from one class to another, both classes need to be present at compile time so the Java compiler can check to ensure that the method signatures are compatible. This requirement by itself makes for a static and nonextensible classing environment. Inevitably in a system like this, functionality gets pushed up higher and higher in the class hierarchy so that the mechanisms will be available to more and more subclasses. Interfaces are designed to avoid this problem. They disconnect the definition of a method or set of methods from the inheritance hierarchy. Since interfaces are in a different hierarchy from classes, it is possible for classes that are unrelated in terms of the class hierarchy to implement"

So, what did the author mean by, "Normally, in order for a method to be called from one class to another" ?. Please drop in your views.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pavan,

All that "Normally, in order for a method to be called from one class to another" means is "a normal method invocation" such as:

Foo foo = new Foo();
foo.bar();  <<== method invocation

In order to call a method you need to know it signature... In an object oriented world, to invoke a method you don't need to know how the method works, you just need to know it's signature... i.e. what the method is called, what parameters it takes (if any), and what it returns (if anything).

We put the "how to call this method" in an interface file, seperate from the class file(s), which defines "how this method works".

BUT WHY??? The implementing class may be authored by a different programmer, in a different organisation, years after the interface. The new class will work with the original code because it exposes the expected interface.

Is that a bit clearer?

Cheers Keith.


EDIT: To continue the above example... let's pretend that third symposium on Universal Publicans Data Exchange Format published a "standard interface" a few years ago (between drinks) to enable local proprietors to maintain a common database off "problem drinkers":

interface Barable {
    void bar();
}

And when we kick a bone-fide patron out:

class Patron {
    void kickOut() {
        // ServiceLocator finds a class which implements the Barable interface.
        Barable service = ServiceLocator.ByInterface("Barable"); 
        service.bar(); <<-- Invoke it. We don't care HOW it works, or WHO implemented it!
    }
}
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Thanks for you response. Yes.It makes sense now. But what does the author wanted to convey when he mentioned about functionality getting pushed up higher and higher?.. –  Pavan Oct 25 '11 at 5:08
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It means that if you're not using interfaces, and you try to do something like this:

someObject.doSomething();

... (in other words, invoking a method on some other class), that other class has to be available to you at compile time, or the compiler will not know how to compile a method call to the doSomething method.

On the other hand, if all you knew about someObject is that it implements an interface that has a doSomething method on it, only the interface needs to be available for the compiler to do its job. Then somebody else could invoke your compiled code, passing in some object that's in a package that wasn't available to you at compile time, as long as it implements your interface.

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An interface simply means, a way to access something.

Classes have to implement an interface and provide an implementation.

public interface Account{

openAccount();

deleteAccount();

}

public class AccountImpl implements Account{

 public void openAccount(){
  // create an account here
 }

 public void deleteAccount(){
  // create an account here
 }

}

On the other hand you could also have:-

public class AccountImpl{
     public void openAccount(){
      // create an account here
     }

     public void deleteAccount(){
      // create an account here
     }
} 

It is not that every class needs to have an interface to provide an implementation.

For example, in the JDBC world, oracle provides the interface but different database vendors provide the driver class implementation. So In order for you to invoke the specific database vendor's method to access the database. You need to know the method signature or the "contract" to adhere to but the underlying implementation is from a separate class.

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