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So I'm writing some python scripts to help me do some simple calculations:

WireRadius = .455 / 1000 / 2  #m, 25AWG
CoilInnerRadius = 10.0 / 1000 / 2 #m
CoilOuterRadius = 20.0 / 1000 / 2 #m
CoilLength = 20.0 / 1000 #m
CoilVolume = 3.14 * (CoilOuterRadius**2 - CoilInnerRadius**2) * CoilLength #m^3
print "CoilVolume: " + str(CoilVolume)
WireCrossSection = 3.14 * WireRadius**2 #m^2
print "WireCrossSection: " + str(WireCrossSection)
LengthOfWire = CoilVolume / WireCrossSection / 2 #m
print "LengthOfWire: " + str(LengthOfWire)

Now, I want the script to print out all the intermediate components, so I can see what is going on. If I screw up, this will also let me pinpoint the line where my math is wrong, because that's when the numbers become nonsensical.

However, this is clearly not very DRY, since I am writing out each variable name not once, not twice, but three times:

LengthOfWire = CoilVolume / WireCrossSection / 2 #m
print "LengthOfWire: " + str(LengthOfWire)

If I was typing this into the interactive shell, it would automatically spit out the values of the intermediate components back at me:

>>> LengthOfWire = CoilVolume / WireCrossSection / 2 #m
14.491003502

which is quite nice, because the assignment statement is preserved meaning I know exactly what the next value is. However, the problem with putting it in the interactive shell is that making changes and re-running the whole script (which is a few dozen calculations long) is tedious. Is there any way to achieve this functionality in scripts run via python script.py?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
def debug(val):
  logging.debug('DEBUG: %r', val)
  return val

 ...
LengthOfWire = debug(CoilVolume / WireCrossSection / 2)

Don't forget to set up your logger appropriately.

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An improved version of Ignacio's function:

import logging

def debug(val, label=None):
  """Prints a debug message consisting of a value and an optional label."""
  if label is None:
    logging.debug('DEBUG: %r', val)
  else:
    logging.debug('DEBUG: %s = %r', label, val)
  return val

 ...
LengthOfWire = debug(CoilVolume / WireCrossSection / 2, label="Wire length")
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Consider using pdb to monitor the execution. I doubt you'll want all those logging statements after you've worked-out the calculation.

Doug Hellmann has a nice worked-out example of using pdb.

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I think the debug function is probably best, but if you really want to do the assignments without obscuring the expressions it is actually possible using metaclasses:

class print_dict(dict):
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        if not key.startswith('_'):
            print("{}: {}".format(key, value))
        super().__setitem__(key, value)


class MetaPrint(type):
    @classmethod
    def __prepare__(metacls, name, bases):
        return print_dict()
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, classdict):
        result = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dict(classdict))
        return result


def foo(x):
    class ShowMe(metaclass=MetaPrint):
        WireRadius = x / 1000 / 2  #m, 25AWG
        CoilInnerRadius = 10.0 / 1000 / 2 #m
        CoilOuterRadius = 20.0 / 1000 / 2 #m
        CoilLength = 20.0 / 1000 #m
        CoilVolume = 3.14 * (CoilOuterRadius**2 - CoilInnerRadius**2) * CoilLength #m^3
        WireCrossSection = 3.14 * WireRadius**2 #m^2
        LengthOfWire = CoilVolume / WireCrossSection / 2 #m

foo(.455)

Then when you've got everything sorted just delete the class ShowMe... line and unindent the class body. The main limitation with this is that you cannot return from inside the class body, so if you need a return value you'd have to give it a name and e.g. return ShowMe.LengthOfWire at the end.

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