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After reading the books, surfing the nets regarding the type of references in Java, I still have some doubts (or I may have interpreted the concept wrong).
It would be a great help for me if anyone clear my doubts.

Let me take an example of a class containing class variables, instance variables and local variables.

public class Test {
  public static ArrayList<String> listCommon = new ArrayList<String>();
  private HashMap<String, String> mapInstance;

  public Test() {
    mapInstance = new HashMap<String, String>();
  }

  public void doSomething(String key) {
    ArrayList<String> local = new ArrayList<String>();
    if(key != null){
      local.add(mapInstance.get(key));
    }

    System.out.println("Value is added in instance Map: ", mapInstance.get(key));
  }
}

My Question are;
1. are listCommon (static variable) and mapInstance (instance variable) Strong reference towards Garbage Collector?
2. Is variable local (defined and used in method) a Weak reference?
3. How the Phantom reference and Soft reference came in picture?
4. OR above 3 concepts are invalid; means that Java defines the references only if you explicitly used the type defined in java.lang.ref package?

Any help would be great for me.

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2  
local is a ArrayList<String> and mapInstance.get(key) returns a String... this does not compile. Perhaps you mean local.add(mapInstance.get(key)); ? –  Yanick Rochon Oct 25 '11 at 4:51
    
@YanickRochon; I have edited the class, please see. –  Naved Oct 25 '11 at 4:53
2  
@Naved: everything is strong reference unless you explicitly used the type defined in java.lang.ref package. –  Prince John Wesley Oct 25 '11 at 4:59
    
is it so? so that means only Strong reference is defined implicitly. –  Naved Oct 25 '11 at 5:01
3  
Yep... everything's strong referenced by default, which will prevent the referenced object being garbage collected. You need EXPLICITLY use "weak" references (et al) if you want the object to eligble for collection even though you're still holding references to it. When you think anbout it... anything else would be madness, regardless of scope, yeah? –  corlettk Oct 25 '11 at 5:08
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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted
  1. are listCommon (static variable) and mapInstance (instance variable) Strong reference towards Garbage Collector?

They are strong references, yes.

  1. Is variable local (defined and used in method) a Weak reference?

No, it is a local variable, so it is a variable, so it is still a strong reference.

  1. How the Phantom reference and Soft reference came in picture?

If you use them. If you don't use them you don't need to worry about them. They are for writing various kinds of caches really.

  1. OR above 3 concepts are invalid; means that Java defines the references only if you explicitly used the type defined in java.lang.ref package?

Reference variables are always strong. The other kinds only arise when you use them explicitly.

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3  
+1 for the answer, although for the sake of completeness I feel "strong reference" is a better term to use than "local strong reference". It is a local variable but there isn't any such thing as "local strong reference" AFAIK. –  Scorpion Oct 25 '11 at 5:07
    
Thank you for the answer –  Naved Oct 25 '11 at 5:15
    
@Scorpion tks, amended. –  EJP Oct 25 '11 at 7:19
add comment

Answer to questions:

  1. Yes, they are strong reference. Weak Reference are defined using Weak reference Object.

  2. No, reason as 1).

  3. Phantom Reference doesn't apply in your example. By default, all instances are strong reference.

  4. Yes, you specify weak/phantom reference using the java.lang.ref package. By default, strong reference is used.

Note: A wikipedia explaination of Weak Reference might be useful.

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Read this blog post about variable references.

** Update **

An atomic reference is an object referenced in such a way that it is accessed atomically; meaning that there are no race condition accessing it. For example:

class RaceTest {
   static private int count = 0;
   static public void main(String...args) {
      Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
             for (int i=0; i<1000000; i++) {
                 count++;
             }
      });
      Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
             for (int i=0; i<1000000; i++) {
                 count--;
             }
         }
      });

      t1.start();
      t2.start();

      t1.join();
      t2.join();

      System.out.println("Final count (should be 0) = " + count);
   }
}

Will spawn two threads that 1) will increment count and 2) will decrement it. Now, both threads will run in parallel and the program will wait until both terminate (at the join point). A common idea would be that since both threads have the same loop (will loop the same amount of time), each will "cancel" each other's operation and thus count should be 0, but this is not the case. Why? Because while, for example, t1 may want to increase the variable, such operation is not atomic, but is more in the order of : get, inc, set. So there may be cases that, even before the second operation inc is made, t2 would have accessed the variable and dec the variable, thus t1 would have had actually +2 the variable. And vice versa in an indefinite manner. (Each run of the code would produce a different value.)

Now, replacing int by AtomicInteger and using incrementAndGet() or decrementAndGet() will solve the issue by rendering the get, inc, set into a single operation, and eliminating the race condition in the code.

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1  
+1 for the link. Thanks –  Naved Oct 25 '11 at 5:15
1  
what is atomic reference then? –  Naved Oct 25 '11 at 5:17
1  
+1 Very useful link –  Alex K Oct 25 '11 at 6:34
    
Although all answers are correct, but I am accepting this because of the valuable contents provided in the link. –  Naved Oct 25 '11 at 7:52
1  
@Mark, just because I used a link instead of writing an exhaustive answer, repeating what's in the link, this does not justify a downvote. And the link does provide the answer to his question. –  Yanick Rochon Oct 25 '11 at 13:35
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