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I have two SQL Server tables. One table has four nvarchar(50) nullable columns and an ID column. The second table has two columns: ID, nvarchar(50) nullable column

I'm trying to insert the rows in the second table into the first table. How can I detect a null column in the first table and insert data from the second one into the null cell?

Ex:

Add from the second table

1   value3

to the first table

1     value1   value2   null    null

so the resulting row is

1     value1   value2   value3   null

Ex2:

Add from the second table

2   value1

to the first table

nothing for ID 2

so the resulting row is

2     value1   null   null   null

Basically I need to update existing rows or create new ones depending on the ID of the second table rows.

share|improve this question
    
Check out the MERGE statement. –  JohnFx Oct 25 '11 at 5:27
    
The problem I see is that depending on the data in the first table, the data from the second table is inserted into different columns... this will be very tricky to get right. If you would be updating the same columns with the data from your second table, then it's a piece of cake.... –  marc_s Oct 25 '11 at 5:28
    
It seems like you placed in different columns what belonged to different rows. Is it possible to modify the database schema instead? –  Laurent' Oct 25 '11 at 5:29
    
Yeah, unfortunately, the data could be inserted into any column, which makes things more difficult. –  Mark13426 Oct 25 '11 at 5:30
    
@Laurent' Anything is fair game. The second table is a normalized version of the first one. The task is to insert data from one to the another. –  Mark13426 Oct 25 '11 at 5:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
declare @T1 table
(
  ID int primary key,
  C1 varchar(50),
  C2 varchar(50),
  C3 varchar(50),
  C4 varchar(50)
);

declare @T2 table
(
  ID int primary key,
  C varchar(50)  
);

insert into @T1 values (1, 'value1', 'value2', null, null) ;

insert into @T2 values (1, 'value3');
insert into @T2 values (2, 'value1');

merge @T1 as T1
using @T2 as T2
on T1.ID = T2.ID
when not matched then
  insert (ID, C1)  values (T2.ID, T2.C)
when matched then
  update set
    C1 = case when T1.C1 is null 
           then T2.C 
           else T1.C1 
         end,
    C2 = case when T1.C1 is not null and 
                   T1.C2 is null 
           then T2.C 
           else T1.C2 
         end,
    C3 = case when T1.C1 is not null and 
                   T1.C2 is not null and 
                   T1.C3 is null 
           then T2.C 
           else T1.C3 
         end,
    C4 = case when T1.C1 is not null and 
                   T1.C2 is not null and 
                   T1.C3 is not null and 
                   T1.C4 is null 
           then T2.C 
           else T1.C4 
         end
;

select *
from @T1;

Result:

ID C1     C2     C3     C4
-- ------ ------ ------ ------
1  value1 value2 value3 NULL
2  value1 NULL   NULL   NULL
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, but it won't work if there are two rows in T2 for the same ID value (which I'd assume is a possibility from the problem statement)(even if the PK is removed from T2) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 26 '11 at 9:34
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever True. That's why I declare ID in @T2 as primary key. Also from a comment in the question "The second table is a normalized version of the first one" makes me assume that ID is the PK in the second table. –  Mikael Eriksson Oct 26 '11 at 9:39
    
I drew the opposite conclusion - I'd expect T2 to contain 4 rows with the same ID value, and each of the C1 - C4 values. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 26 '11 at 9:42

Here is another try. I'm completely changing your architecture here but you still might find it usefull.

Unsorted Value Set

For this answer I'm assuming that the column order is NOT important (you're basically storing a set of values in them). I think a better architecture for this is to store each value on a different row. This make querying and modifying much easier (hence my comment on your question).

What I would do in this case is to create a new table that looks like this:

ID    ValueSet
1     value1
1     value2
1     value3
2     value1

To transform your two tables into this one, you can use the following query:

SELECT ID,C1 AS `ValueSet` FROM `tab1` WHERE C1 IS NOT NULL
   UNION SELECT ID,C2 FROM `tab1` WHERE C2 IS NOT NULL
   UNION SELECT ID,C3 FROM `tab1` WHERE C3 IS NOT NULL
   UNION SELECT ID,C4 FROM `tab1` WHERE C4 IS NOT NULL
   UNION SELECT ID,C1 FROM `tab2` WHERE C1 IS NOT NULL

This way NULL values are removed and tab2 values are gracefully added whenever needed.

Again, note that you loose the column order here.

Sorted Value Set

If order is important, you still can include at creation using this modified query:

SELECT ID,C1 AS `ValueSet`,'1' AS 'Order'  FROM `tab1` WHERE C1 IS NOT NULL
UNION SELECT ID,C2,'2' FROM `tab1` WHERE C2 IS NOT NULL
UNION SELECT ID,C3,'3' FROM `tab1` WHERE C3 IS NOT NULL
UNION SELECT ID,C4,'4' FROM `tab1` WHERE C4 IS NOT NULL
UNION SELECT ID,C1,'5' FROM `tab2` WHERE C1 IS NOT NULL

Then, if you need the sorted valueset for ID 1, you can use:

SELECT ValueSet FROM `myNewTable` WHERE ID = '1' ORDER BY Order ASC;

which will yield:

value1
value2
value3
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