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I have a file called test_module.c that has some differences that I want to apply to my local working copy.

I tried to create patch file from the remote by doing the following. However, git didn't complain about any errors. And didn't create any patch file either.

git format-patch master/dev_branch test/test_module.c

It is possible to create a patch of a single file, that I can apply?

(Using git version 1.7.5.4)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you give git format-patch a single revision, it will produce patches for each commit since that revision. If you see no output from that command, then I suspect that there were no changes to that file between origin/master and your current HEAD. As an alternative, you can provide a revision range (e.g. origin/master~3..origin/master) which covers the changes introduced to that file. Or, if the changes you want to produce a patch for are just contained in the single commit at the tip of origin/master, you can use the -1 parameter, as in:

git format-patch -1 origin/master test/test_module.c
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I used the following with the hash being the last commit. git format-patch [hash] origin/master test/test_module.c However, I got these errors. What would normally cause these? error: patch failed: test/test_module.c:176 error: test/test_module.c: patch does not apply Thanks. –  ant2009 Oct 25 '11 at 6:59
    
I think you may want git format-patch [hash]..origin/master test_module.c instead, or origin/master may be regarded as a path. –  Mark Longair Oct 25 '11 at 7:22

You can use following syntax for creating patch for single file:

git format-patch [commit_hash] [file]
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