Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
        do{

        System.out.println("inside do");
        for (int i = 0; i < i2; i++) {

             String s2 = m_area.m_items.get(i).returnName();
             if (s2.contains(s)) {

                itemexist_check = true;
                player.addItem(m_area.m_items.get(i));
                m_area.m_items.remove(i);
                } else {

                 //do nothing
             }
         }
         itemexist_check = true;
        }while(itemexist_check == false);

When this do statement is run, it will happily perform the "player.addItem(m_area.m_items.get(i))", but when it gets to "m_area.m_items.remove(i)" (m_items is a LinkedList) , it throws an "OutOfBoundsException: Index 1, Size 1". Via printing the size of the LinkedList, as well as printing the value of "i", I have determined that prior to the "m_area.m_items.remove(i)", the size of the LinkedList is 2, and the value of "i" is 0. I understood why it threw the exception. There is obviously no Element 0 in the LinkedList. What I don't know is, why didn't it throw the exception on the "player.addItem(m_area.m_items.get(i))"? Something isn't right here, please help.

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
oh. apparently LinkedList.get only throws the exception when the index is less than 0, while LinkedList.remove throws the exception when the index is equal to 0. I guess my real question is, how can I fix my code? –  Blackvein Oct 25 '11 at 7:03
    
Your question is unclear. For ex. what does i2 point to? –  Narendra Yadala Oct 25 '11 at 7:08
    
Incorrect. LinkedList.get throws IndexOutOfBoundsException - if the index is out of range (index < 0 || index >= size()) –  Miserable Variable Oct 25 '11 at 7:08
    
As a sidenote: why did you wrap the whole thing in a do while loop? It would seem it will always exit due to that last statement setting itemexist_check to true. Unless you 'anonymized' this code and removed some other code, it's no use making this code more complicated than necessary. –  JBert Oct 25 '11 at 7:21
    
Please elaborate a bit. Why does the for loop has to be inside the do-while. Why do you have to remove the m_item you add to the player? Why don't you use an enhanced for-loop and instead you meddle with the indices? –  Efthymis Oct 25 '11 at 7:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The savest way to deal with list traversal + removal is to separate the two. Hence, iterate through your list using a standard forearch loop (also much easier and faster than get calls). Instead of removing the item, add it to a separate list and after your loop use m_area.m_items.removeAll(removedElementsList).

share|improve this answer

Is I2 the size of the list? Then you are staying in the loop one iteration too many. You're continuation condition should be i < i2-1.

And no, remove() does not throw an exception when index is 0, only when it's less than zero.

As for the advice to use a for-each loop, be careful. Normally you can't modify the list within the loop -- a restriction that looks like would apply here since you are modifying m_area.m_items.

share|improve this answer

The best way is using foreach loop instead for and for removing items save their in other set and use RemoveAll after loop

for (TypeOfListItem item : m_area.m_items) {

         String s2 = item.returnName();
         if (s2.contains(s)) {

            itemexist_check = true;
            player.addItem(item);
            itemsForDelete.add(item);
            } else {
             //do nothing
         }
     }

m_area.m_items.removeAll(itemsForDelete);

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.