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Peace be upon you all.

javas.swing.JTextField does not support numerals of other languages like arabic, hebrew, chinese on input. I have researched a lot on this but I couldnt find a solution.

I really need functionality as my whole application is based on Javax.swing components.

Need solution guys!!!

Put a JTextField on a simple plain GUI. Go to the regional settings and select Arabic (saudia arabia) as locale and customize the 'digit substitution' as 'national' (System wide arabic numerals applied). Now go to the java app and type numbers in the textfield. The number would not be in arabic but in english. This is the problem..

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1  
It should support any printable Unicode character. Are they just missing from the font you are using? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 25 '11 at 8:05
    
What is specifically not working? Arabic numbers are unicode symbols, so if fonts present they should be shown. And what concerning Hebrew numbers? Do you mean that system does not understand automatically that א means 1 and ו means 6? –  AlexR Oct 25 '11 at 8:07
    
you are wrong Java (then GUI for example JTextField) supporting all knows Charsets / Locales / Fonts, hmmm please what's your question –  mKorbel Oct 25 '11 at 8:08
    
Put a JTextField on a simple plain GUI. Go to the regional settings and select Arabic (saudia arabia) as locale and customize the 'digit substitution' as 'national' (System wide arabic numerals applied). Now go to the java app and type numbers in the textfield. The number would not be in arabic but in english. This is the problem.. –  Zaki Imtiaz Oct 25 '11 at 8:22
    
First check that it works correctly with some Windows app, e.g. Notepad. If it does try TextField instead of JTextField. –  AlexR Oct 25 '11 at 8:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Note: this is not an answer to the question - just a comment with a code snippet

In SwingX we had an issue with NumberFormat not showing arabic digits properly. Nothing helped except allowing client code access to the internals of JXMonthView so they could manually adjust the unicode range to use for the digits:

    private void adjustFormatSymbols(Locale locale, DecimalFormat df) {
        if ("ar".equals(locale.getLanguage())) {
            DecimalFormatSymbols dfs = df.getDecimalFormatSymbols();
            // set the beginning of the range to Arabic digits
            dfs.setZeroDigit('\u0660');
            df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(dfs);
        }
    }
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Actually this is probably the only way that we have to do it...However it has certain disadvantages..but solves the problem in a bigger context. –  Zaki Imtiaz Oct 28 '11 at 13:40

Maybe you could try this (at least for searching for clues):

register a KeyListener with both the AWT TextField and Swing JTextField and see what is received when you type "1" on the keyboard.

Then, if you get different codes, you could possibly check if you can write a general event handler that gets all keys and replace keys 0-9 with the matching code in arabic locale.

Not a perfect solution, but it might work.

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I have tried this and sort of implemented this too. But this kind of overridden solutions are generally not accepted in enterprise solutions, u know, due to standards. This is very strange that Java does not provide complete internationalization support in Swing components. =S –  Zaki Imtiaz Oct 25 '11 at 11:14
    
Maybe you should consider reporting a bug to Oracle? –  jfpoilpret Oct 25 '11 at 12:48
    
That probably is the only option left. Thanks. –  Zaki Imtiaz Oct 26 '11 at 4:49
1  
@Zaki Imtiaz recently, Hovercraft implemented a DocumentFilter doing the replace stackoverflow.com/questions/6470260/… –  kleopatra Oct 27 '11 at 9:31

It's not really an answer, but here's an sscce that may suggest a way forward. See also Supported Locales.

import java.awt.ComponentOrientation;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.text.DecimalFormatSymbols;
import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.util.Locale;
import javax.swing.JFormattedTextField;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

/** @see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7886323 */
public class ArabicNumbers extends JPanel {

    private static final Locale arabic = new Locale("ar", "SA");
    private static final DecimalFormat format =
        (DecimalFormat) NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance(arabic);
    private static final JFormattedTextField field =
        new JFormattedTextField(format);
    private ComponentOrientation arabicOrientation =
        ComponentOrientation.getOrientation(arabic);

    public ArabicNumbers() {
        this.setLayout(new GridLayout());
        format.setDecimalFormatSymbols(new DecimalFormatSymbols(arabic));
        field.applyComponentOrientation(arabicOrientation);
        field.setValue(123.45);
        this.add(field);
    }

    private void display() {
        JFrame f = new JFrame("ArabicNumbers");
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.add(this);
        f.pack();
        f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new ArabicNumbers().display();
            }
        });
    }
}
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This changes only the orientation of the text. I need to have arabic numerals while I write instead of English 12345. –  Zaki Imtiaz Oct 26 '11 at 4:48
    
Exactly. It's just a starting point, as I am only familiar with western Arabic numerals. I've updated the code to use an instance of DecimalFormatSymbols, localized to "ar_SA". You might try customizing it to use Hindi numerals. –  trashgod Oct 26 '11 at 14:57
    
hmm ... probably missing something: I only see the "text" part in arabic (probably, cant judge :-), not the digits, 123.45 appears just so –  kleopatra Oct 27 '11 at 9:13

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