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I am trying to convert given dates to the corresponding days of the week using Perl with Date::Day.

The input string is in the format: October 24, 2011; March 12, 1989; November 26, 1940.

I have written a script which will parse the above input and convert each date to a format which will be accepted by Date::Day::day().

This subroutine accepts the input in format, mm,dd,yyyy. I have done this using hashes. Recently posted a thread on this query on stackoverflow and with the help of other members, was able to do it.

Here's my script and it returns me ERR for each of the dates instead of returning the Day of Week corresponding to the date.

There seems to be something wrong with the input format of the parameter passed to day() subroutine.

Here's more documentation on the Perl Module I am using: http://helpspy.com/c.m/programming/lang/perl/cpan/c06/Date/Day/d_1/

I am interested to know, where exactly I am going wrong. Do I have to make some modifications to the date before passing it as a parameter to the day() subroutine?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use Date::Day;
use strict;
use warnings;

my @arr;

print "Enter the string: ";
my $str=<>;
chomp $str;

my @dates= split /; /,$str;

my %days= ("January",1,"February",2,"March",3,"April",4,"May",5,"June",6,"July",7,"August",8,"September",9,"October",10,"November",11,"December",12);

my @output = map {
my $pattern=$_;
$pattern =~ s/(\S*)\s/$days{$1}, /;
$pattern =~ s/\s//g;
$pattern
} @dates;

print &day(11,9,1987); # for test purpose and it returns correct value

foreach $output (@output)
{
chomp $output;
my $result=&day($output);
push(@arr,$result);
}

foreach my $arr (@arr)
{
print $arr."; ";
}

The output of the above script is: ERR; ERR; ERR;

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're passing a string to the sub &day.

Here is a rewrite :

#!/usr/local/bin/perl 
use Data::Dump qw(dump);
use strict;
use warnings;
use Date::Day;

print "Enter the string: ";
my $str=<>;
chomp $str;

my @dates= split /; /,$str;

my %days = ("January",1,"February",2,"March",3,"April",4,"May",5,"June",6,"July",7,"August",8,"September",9,"October",10,"November",11,"December",12);

my @output = map {
    my @l = split/[ ,]+/;
    $l[0] = $days{$l[0]};
    [@l];
} @dates;

my @arr;
foreach my $date(@output) {
    push @arr, &day(@$date);
}
dump@arr;

output:

("MON", "SUN", "TUE")
share|improve this answer
    
works great! +1 – Neon Flash Oct 25 '11 at 10:21

Date::Day looks like a rather old module. It was last updated almost nine years ago. That's not to say that it's broken, but these days the DateTime family of modules handle pretty much any date/time processing that you want. I'd strongly recommend taking a look at those instead.

Here's an example solving your problem using DateTime::Format::Strptime.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use DateTime::Format::Strptime;

my $dt_parser = DateTime::Format::Strptime->new(
  pattern => '%B %d, %Y'
);

while (<DATA>) {
  chomp;

  my $dt = $dt_parser->parse_datetime($_);

  say $dt->day_name;
}

__END__
October 24, 2011
March 12, 1989
November 26, 1940
share|improve this answer
1  
DateTime is probably one of the best written pieces of software ever, in any language. – Leonardo Herrera Oct 25 '11 at 13:41

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