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Don't be put off by the long text, the points are quite trivial but require a bit of code to illustrate the problem. :-)

The Setup:

Say I would like to create a trait, here modeled as a Converter of some kind, that itself is generic but has a typed method convert() that returns an appropriately typed result object, say a Container[T]:

 trait Converter {
   def convert[T]( input: T ) : Container[T]
 } 
 trait Container[T]  // details don't matter

My question is about type constraints on methods, in particular for enforcing equality, and has two closely related parts.

Part 1: Say now that there was a specialized container type that was particularly suitable for array-based contents, like so:

 object Container {
   trait ForArrays[U] extends Container[Array[U]] 
 }

Given this possibility, I'd now like to specialize the Converter and in particular the return type of the convert() method, to the specialized Container.ForArrays type:

 object Converter {
   trait ForArrays extends Converter {
     // the following line is rubbish - how to do this right?
     def convert[E,T <: Array[E]]( input: T ) : Container.ForArrays[E]
   } 
 }

So that I can do something like this:

val converter = new Converter.ForArrays { ... }
val input = Array( 'A', 'B', 'C' )   
val converted : Container.ForArrays[Char] = converter.convert( input )

Basically I want Scala, if the type of converter is known to be Converter.ForArrays, to also infer the specialized return type of convert[Char]() as Container.ForArrays[Char], i.e. the matching container type plus the array type of the input. Is this or something like it possible and if so, how do I do it? E.g. how do I specify the type parameters / bounds on convert() (what is provided is just a stand-in - I have no idea how to do this). Oh, and naturally so that it still overrides its super method, otherwise nothing is gained.

Part 2: As a fallback, should this not be possible, I could of course push the convert function down into the Array-focused variant, like so:

 trait Converter   // now pretty useless as a shared trait
 object Converter {
   trait ForValues extends Converter { 
     def convert[T]( input: T ) : Container[T] 
   }
   trait ForArrays extends Converter {
     def convert[E]( input: Array[E] ) : Container.ForArrays[E]
   } 
 }

OK. Now say I have an even more specialized Converter.ForArrays.SetBased that can internally use a set of elements of type E (the same as the 'input' array element type) to do some particular magic during the conversion. The set is now a parameter of the trait, however, like so:

 case class SetBased( set: Set[F] ) extends Converter.ForArrays {
   // the following line is also rubbish...
   def convert[E = F]( input: Array[E] ) : Container.ForArrays[E] = {...}
 }

Again, this is about the type parameters of the convert() method. The difficulty here is: how do I glue the type parameter of the class - F - to the type parameter of the method - E - such that the Scala compiler will only let the user call convert() with an array whose elements match the elements of the set? Example:

val set = Set( 'X', 'Y', 'Z' )
val converter = new Converter.ForArrays.SetBased( set )
val input = Array( 'A', 'B', 'C' )   
val converted : Container.ForArrays[Char] = converter.convert( input )
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, you can't. For the same reason you can't narrow argument types or widen return types when overriding a method (but can narrow return type). Here is what you can do, however (for your fallback solution):

trait Converter {
  type Constraint[T]
} 

trait ForArrays extends Converter {
  def convert[E]( input: Array[E] )( implicit ev : Constraint[T] ) : Container.ForArrays[E]
}

case class SetBased[F](set: Set[F]) extends Converter {
   type Constraint[T] = T =:= F
   def convert[E]( input: Array[E] )( implicit ev : E =:= F ) = ...
} 
share|improve this answer
    
OK, the point about not being able to narrow argument types seems to apply exactly to the first part, since it only permits Ts that are also Array[E]. It makes sense to prevent a user holding a supertype Converter expecting T from inadvertently calling a method on a subtype that expects a narrower argument type and that could fail on it. Here, however, I just want the benefit of the narrowed return type. But the compiler cannot tell, and it's probably a rare edge case, so there's no point in making this work. –  Gregor Scheidt Oct 25 '11 at 12:23

I'm going to assume that Container.ForArrays is a subclass of Container, without this, Converter.ForArrays.convert won't match the signature of the overridden Converter.convert

Try writing it something like this:

object Converter {
  trait ForArrays extends Converter {
    def convert[E] (input: Array[E]): Container.ForArrays[E]
  } 
}

Regarding your fallback solution. If two types are the same, then just use the same type param!

case class SetBased (set: Set[F]) extends Converter.ForArrays {
  def convert (input: Array[F]): Container.ForArrays[F] = {...}
}
share|improve this answer
    
As written, your convert in Converter.ForArrays does not override the one in Converter (different argument). Is it intended to be overloading? –  Didier Dupont Oct 25 '11 at 9:43
    
Good point! Actually, it doesn't need to override, depending on how you intend to use it. –  Kevin Wright Oct 25 '11 at 10:36
    
@Kevin Yes, the idea was to have Container.ForArrays be a subclass of Container. That is also how I declared it in the example, but it was easy to overlook. I wanted the overriding convert() to specialize the return type of its overridden parent method. –  Gregor Scheidt Oct 25 '11 at 12:12
    
@KevinWright Regarding the first suggestion: as didierd pointed out, it does not override the parent method; that was essentially my problem and the motivation for the post. The second suggestion is interesting and kind of obvious, so I will try that out. Unfortunately, the example was simplified a bit - in the real code, the situation is even worse since my set contains, say, Char but the convert method expects Array[Char], specializing a method expecting Array[Array[Char]] :-) Oh well. –  Gregor Scheidt Oct 25 '11 at 12:15

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