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I was thinking, does C++ or Java have a way to do something like this

Interface IF1{
    ....
};

Interface IF2{
    ....
};


function f(Object o : Implements IF1, IF2){
    ...
}

meaning a typesystem that allows you to require implementation of interfaces.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

You can do this in Java:

public <I extends IF1 & IF2> void methodName(I i){

....

}

This way you force I to implement your two interfaces, otherwise it won't even compile.

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Nice answer. Q: Syntactically shouldn't it be implements rather than extends ? Or is it a general case where I can be an interface or a class. –  iammilind Oct 25 '11 at 8:57
2  
Thanks. You are correct, syntactically it should be 'impements', however there is no support for that in Java generics (at least that I know of) you use the 'extends' keyword whether you are referring to interfaces or classes. –  Francisco Paulo Oct 25 '11 at 9:08
    
Good answer. The method used here is called Generics in Java (comparable to templates in C++). –  Thirler Oct 25 '11 at 10:25
    
Why can't I declare a Collection like that e.g. LinkedList<? extends IF1 & IF2> ? –  Bat0u89 Nov 19 '12 at 20:12

In C++, we can use std::is_base_of<IF1, Derived>. This has to be used with the actual derived and base type and will be easy to use with the help of tempaltes.

template<typename T>
void f (T obj)
{
  static_assert(is_base_of<IF1,T>::value && is_base_of<IF2,T>::value,
  "Error: Not implementing proper interfaces.");
  ...
}

If T (a derived class) is not implementing IF1 and IF2, then the assertion will fail at compile time.

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static_assert use two arguments msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd293588.aspx –  KindDragon Oct 28 '11 at 16:51
    
@KindDragon, thank for pointing out, edited. –  iammilind Oct 29 '11 at 2:30

in C++ you can do something like that:

template <typename T>
void f(T &o)
{
    IF1 &i1 = o;
    IF2 &i2 = o;

    //function body
}

lines with interface pointer are needed to ensure that T implements both interfaces (it will cause compiler error if it is not).

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Just an FYI. For private / protected inheritance, this may still generate compiler error ! Additionally, it has little runtime overhead (of assigning pointers) for successful cases. –  iammilind Oct 25 '11 at 8:51
1  
I thought interface implies public inheritance. What kind of interface it is otherwise? –  n0rd Oct 25 '11 at 8:52
2  
If i1 and i2 are not used, they will be eliminated by optimizer –  n0rd Oct 25 '11 at 8:54
1  
@n0rd: A class can privately inherit an interface, and have its member functions pass this to functions that expect that interface. –  Mike Seymour Oct 25 '11 at 12:33

Using boost libraries (type_traits, enable_if, and_), you can do something quite elaborate.

template <typename T>
typename boost::enable_if<           // Check whether
    boost::mpl::and_<                // Both of the following conditions are met
        boost::is_base_of<IF1, T>,   // T derives from IF1
        boost::is_base_of<IF2, T>    // T derives from IF2
        >
    >
>::type
function(T& t)
{
  // ...
}

There may be a few quirks here and there in my code, but you get the idea.

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In java there's nothing like this, I would add a third element implementing the two interfaces and use it as a parameter. And this will makes perfect sense to me, because the third object is neither an IF1 nor an IF2, is just an IF3.

interface a {
  int foo();
}


interface b {
  long foo2();
}

interface c extends a, b {
  long daaa();
}

public class TestInterface {

  void someMethod (c theThird) {
    return;
  }
}

this makes sense to me.

EDIT: Wasn't aware of

public <I extends a & b> void methodName(I i){

}

However I found it confusing. If an object needs to implement two different Interfaces I prefer to have a third one. IMHO it's cleaner.

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Wrong on all accounts... –  Michael Borgwardt Oct 25 '11 at 8:47
    
@MichaelBorgwardt: You're getting it wrong sir. –  BigMike Oct 25 '11 at 9:13
    
Nope, still you who's wrong. There is something like that in Java as you have noticed, and it's also completely wrong that "the third object is neither an IF1 nor an IF2, is just an IF3". And while you may prefer to have interfaces that exist only to merge two others, the Generics approach also works with third, party classes you cannot change. –  Michael Borgwardt Oct 25 '11 at 9:24

What's wrong with:

interface IF1IF2 extends IF1, IF2 {}

void f(IF1IF2 o) {
}

Why overcomplicate things?

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2  
Although this could work, it does not make sense to change the objects passed to that function (and you don't always have the option to change them). Also imagine how complicated this would become several combinations per used object. Using generics (such as the answer by Francisco Paulo) you can specify the type of object you want in the place where you want it, and only there. –  Thirler Oct 25 '11 at 10:27
    
@Thirler: Either the object already implements both interfaces or you have to change things. Are you absolutely certain that this is the only function that will ever need to be passed arguments that combine those two interfaces? To me it seems very likely that you'll end up formulating the same set of constraints in multiple places, forsaking the opportunity of expressing them in a single place (and give such a combination a name!!). Otherwise, why use interfaces in the first place? Either your argument has methods with the correct signature or it doesn't. –  Nicola Musatti Oct 25 '11 at 11:03
    
Of course the class used needs to implement both interfaces. It just does not need to specify all possibly combinations of those interfaces that can be required together by other methods. I agree that you will be specifying the generic constraints for each method, but in very readable and clear way. And you are forgetting that often you want functions that accept objects that you have not written yourself (and thus can not change) –  Thirler Oct 25 '11 at 11:28
    
So there is a trade-off: either you increase generality by repeating your constraints over and over, which amounts to coding your resulting interface multiple times, or you make your constraints explicit, write them in a single place, give them a name and accept to be able to handle only objects that explicitly implement the combined interface. Claiming that one approach is always better appears to me as a bit unsubstantiated. –  Nicola Musatti Oct 25 '11 at 12:35
    
Note that what I wrote applies specifically to Java: in C++ you'd just write a template and rely on statically checked duck typing, but then you probably wouldn't have the original interfaces in the first place. –  Nicola Musatti Oct 25 '11 at 12:38

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