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If I have rspec test like following:

context "main context" do

  before(:all) do
     # code for before :all
     puts "my fore :all"
  end 
  describe "Scenario-1" do
     context "my context 1" do
        it "should blablabla" do

     end
        it "should blablabla" do

     end
      end
      context "my context 2" do
        it "should blablabla" do

    end
        it "should blablabla" do

     end
      end
    end # end of describe "Scenario-1"

    describe "Scenario-2"
       context "my context 3" do
         it "should blablabla" do

     end
         it "should blablabla" do

     end
       end
    end #end of "Scenario-2"

end #end of main context

Two questions to ask:

1. Is it so that the before(:all) declare actually get called in each sub context ? I thought it is only called once during the whole test, but when I run my test, What I experienced is that the code in before(:all) get executed in each context, that's it get run when each context started, why?

(As you noticed I have "puts" as part of my before(:all) code, and I saw this puts in each sub-context when run the test, why? isn't before(:all) should only be executed once during the whole test??)

2. When I run my test, Why the order of the test running is from bottom context to up context (while inside each context, the order of "it" is up-down)? How to change the test order on context level then?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1) before(:all) should be running only once... but there is a known isue about it doing exactly what you've pointed out. Discussed here: http://rubyforge.org/pipermail/rspec-users/2010-September/018

2) tests must run independently of one another. to ensure that you aren't making any assumptions. Thus testing suites often run the tests in random or reverse order - to be sure that you aren't doing that.

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Hi, I think I described my experience clearly, but anyhow, I updated the description. The code in before(:all) get executed when each context started. That's my question. Please check my update. –  Mellon Oct 25 '11 at 9:59
    
Yes, you clearly described that it's being called in each subcontext... but what is actually happening to you specifically? can you give me an example of what you are actually putting in before(:all) that is being called in each subcontext? It's just that it's easier to solve an issue if I've got a real example to work with, rather than an abstract description. –  Taryn East Oct 25 '11 at 10:03
    
Hi, The code inside before(:all) is Object.create(...), which just create some objects in database. Nothing special. –  Mellon Oct 25 '11 at 10:09
    
I ask because when I use exactly your example and put a "puts 'I'm in before all now'" in the before(:all)... it just runs once at the beginning. So it may be something to do with what you're putting in the before(:all). –  Taryn East Oct 25 '11 at 10:10
    
So... how do you know that it's being run more than once (ie in every context) what is the result? –  Taryn East Oct 25 '11 at 10:10
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Firstly, read this - especially the part at the bottom of the page

secondly, a trick I learned recently is that you can use after(:all)

after :all do
  @users.each { |user| user.destroy! }
end

Pretty neat

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ps, you need to use before(:each) and not before(:all) –  marflar Oct 25 '11 at 10:27
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