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I am profiling an application and noticed that 52% (195MB) of the memory is being used by char[] and 20% by String. This is a large project with a lot of dependencies and I've just seen it so I have a couple of related questions to help me get started:

Does String s = "some text" create a char[]?

I've noticed there's hundreds of String s = new String("some text") with no apparent reason. Is this the culprit?

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so, is it new String("aa") or just "aa"? –  Thilo Oct 25 '11 at 9:52
    
There's both. I'd assume there's not much I can do with "aa", but perhaps using new String("aa") is wrong and could be optimised. –  Michael Oct 25 '11 at 9:56
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up vote 10 down vote accepted

Does String s = "some text" create a char[]?

This doesn't create any objects.

I've noticed there's hundreds of String s = new String("some text") with no apparent reason. Is this the culprit?

This creates a copy of the String and possibly the char[] (two objects). A copy is only taken if the String represents the substring of another string.

I would ensure you have a version of Java which supports -XX:+UseCompressedStrings This is on by default in later versions of Java and allows the JVM to use byte[] instead of char[] which can be half the size.

However, 400 MB isn't that big these days and buy more memory may be the simplest solution. You can get 16 GB for as little as $120.

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(+1) Having looked at the JDK6 code, I doubt that new String("some text") would copy the char[]. I am pretty sure it would use the same array reference. –  NPE Oct 25 '11 at 9:58
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I'd be surprised too about copying char[]. If the immutable String is implemented correctly, this shouldn't be necessary... –  Lukas Eder Oct 25 '11 at 10:00
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new String() isn't necessary 99.9% of the time. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 25 '11 at 10:01
    
@LukasEder, The char[] can be copied, but not in this case. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 25 '11 at 10:02
    
@Peter: You're right. I just checked the source... Nice to know –  Lukas Eder Oct 25 '11 at 10:03
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