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Just a thought really... and wondering if Gzipped JSON already covers this.

But say you have a list of game objects in a response:

game = {
    name: 'Randomer Quest!',
    description: 'Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!',
    activated: true,
    points: 10,
    thumb: 'randomer-quest.jpg'
};

When you json_encode this, it becomes 151 bytes:

{"games": [{"name":"Randomer Quest!","description":"Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!","activated":true,"points":10,"thumb":"randomer-quest.jpg"}]}

Ok... but what if you have a list of about 100 games? That's about 13,913 bytes... but do we really need to keep declaring those properties? I know you can just decode it and loop through it (the magic) but what if we're a little more intelligent about it and declare the properties in a seperate object and then have an array of data? We'd have to prefill properties that aren't there usually but I still think its worth it.

Something like this:

{
"games": {
    p: ["name", "description", "activated", "points", "thumb"],
    d: [
        ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"],
        ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"]
    ]
}

}

P are properties, D is the data in arrays. Afterwards we have: 9,377 bytes 67% of the size!

Ok I know you're going to say that's nothing but you do see requests that are more like 40-100kb. And I think that's quite a massive difference. Anyone employing something like this already? Perhaps we have tools that already do this automatically?

32bitkid has pretty much said that if you were going to do this, you might as well just trim it down to CSV format... which makes sense... that would be around 9,253 bytes 66.5%.

"name", "description", "activated", "points", "thumb"
"Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"
"Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"

I've seen JSON requests of about 100kb, which would turn into 66.5kb (losing 33.5kb)

What do you think?

Dom

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1  
JSONH does similar. –  hyperslug Oct 25 '11 at 10:55
    
that would be a "TSON", a Table format JSON (I had to suggest a name) –  SparK Oct 25 '11 at 11:03
    
I really like this idea! Got this exact problem now - JSON response too large due to massive repetition of property names. –  HorseloverFat Jun 11 '13 at 13:51
    
I think CSV as has been said below would be awesome... JSON isn't exactly readable without tools so why not create a CSV web reader that makes it viewable for development etc –  Dominic Watson Jun 12 '13 at 17:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I agree this is much more compact.

{
    "games": {
        p: ["name", "description", "activated", "points", "thumb"],
        d: [
            ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"],
            ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"]
        ]
    }
}

But wait, you could optimize it further, do you really need the "games" object? this is even smaller!

{
    p: ["name", "description", "activated", "points", "thumb"],
    d: [
        ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"],
        ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"]
    ]
}

And really, whats the point of the "p" and "d" and the object that contains, i know that the property names are going to be first, and my data is going to be second?

[
    ["name", "description", "activated", "points", "thumb"],
    ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"],
    ["Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"]
]

And those array and object markers are just getting in the way, save a few more bytes!

"name", "description", "activated", "points", "thumb"
"Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"
"Randomer Quest!", "Randomer's Quest is a brilliant game!", true, 10, "randomer-quest.jpg"

Wait... this format already exists. It is CSV. And its been around since the mid 1960's. And its part of the reason why XML and JSON were invented in the first place. JSON and XML add flexibility to the objects being stored and to make them more human readable than tightly packed binary objects. Are you really that worried about the size of the data going over the pipe? If you are (if that is, in fact, your bottleneck) then there are a bunch of different ways to address that problem.

But, personally, I think you should use the technology and the tools for what they are made for, and what they excel at doing.

You're trying to use a hammer to screw in a screw... You'll get it in the wall, but it wont be pretty or pleasant for either party involved.

Find a pattern that solves your problem, not the other way around.

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Good point :D Now that you mention it... perhaps it would be a good idea to start using CSV a little more. I like JSON but I just think so much is wasted in passing the properties for every single thing for a little bit of readability (not often you need to read raw JSON). Guess I'll start using CSV alot more. I mean JSON responses have to be parsed anyway so run a CSV through the parser to achieve the same result. Will update my question with the size of CSV :P –  Dominic Watson Oct 26 '11 at 18:44
    
@Dominic: which snipped here do you want to deal with on a daily basis (or three months from now) ? The one which describes which field is for, or the totally unmarked one (the last one) ? The mere fact that you have to remember which field of the CSV file is for isn't worth a few bytes. But caveat emptor. After a few months of using CSV you'll see what I mean. Also, JSON enables you to nest objects inside others, what CSV doesn't. –  Alexandre C. Oct 26 '11 at 20:06
    
Sure if you need to nest objects inside others then I can't see any other way around it but I still don't see what the issue is with not having the label next to each of the items. You don't read raw JSON as there are tools that make it readable as would be the same thing here. –  Dominic Watson Oct 31 '11 at 21:13

From experience, the primary reason behind using text based formats is that they are easy for a human (with unsophisticated tools) to read and debug. [For instance, I consider XML a huge no-go for most tasks].

A quite old reference about why we use text formats, although still worth a serious read is this chapter of The Art of Unix Programming.

So you must aim for clarity, not size. Aiming for size is a case of premature optimization.

If you are worried about bandwidth or storage, consider compressing the data. Text formats lend themselves well to fast and powerful compression, to the point where technically, they are not inferior to binary formats sizewise. Also, you separate the concerns of 1/ representing data conveniently 2/ transferring data efficiently.

I'm not knowledgeable in this domain, but I'm ready to bet there are 1/ Javascript libraries for compression 2/ systematic ways to have the data compressed at the protocol level.

Last, if you are worried about performance, well, you'd rather have a compelling reason (and solid profiling data) for giving up the comfort that text based formats provide.

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Ahah yes but a raw JSON output isn't readable without nice tools for displaying or going through it :D Like a JSON formatter for Chrome: chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/… –  Dominic Watson Oct 25 '11 at 10:46
    
@Dominic Watson: It is all about trading off readability and availability. JSON is readily available in many environments, and much less painful to read with the naked eye than XML. Also, the tools for manipulating XML tend to be much heavier than those for JSON (and I've yet to see a use case where you need XML over a lighter alternative). –  Alexandre C. Oct 25 '11 at 10:51

I use ColdFusion for server-side language, which has a function serializeJson(). This creates a JSON packet, and if it's from a query, it looks almost exactly like what you're proposing.

{
    "COLUMNS": [
        "ID",
        "NAME"
    ],
    "DATA": [
        [
            1,
            "London"
        ],
        [
            2,
            "Liverpool"
        ],
        [
            3,
            "Glasgow"
        ]
    ]
}

Works pretty well too.

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This is quite interesting, you may want to check BSON if you have a lot of data to transfer.

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