Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to parallelize a function which takes as input three arrays (x, y, and prb) and one scalar, and outputs three arrays (P1, Pt1, and Px).

The original c code is here (the outlier and E are inconsequential):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define max(A, B)   ((A) > (B) ? (A) : (B))
#define min(A, B)   ((A) < (B) ? (A) : (B))

void cpd_comp(
        double* x,
        double* y, 
        double* prb,
        double* sigma2,
        double* outlier,
        double* P1,
        double* Pt1,
        double* Px,
        double* E,
        int N,
        int M,
        int D
        )

{
  int       n, m, d;
  double    ksig, diff, razn, outlier_tmp, sp;
  double    *P, *temp_x;

  P = (double*) calloc(M, sizeof(double));
  temp_x = (double*) calloc(D, sizeof(double));

  ksig = -2.0 * *sigma2;


  for (n=0; n < N; n++) {

      sp=0;
      for (m=0; m < M; m++) {
          razn=0;
          for (d=0; d < D; d++) {
             diff=*(x+n+d*N)-*(y+m+d*M);  diff=diff*diff;
             razn+=diff;
          }

          *(P+m)=exp(razn/ksig) ;
          sp+=*(P+m);
      }


      *(Pt1+n)=*(prb+n);
      for (d=0; d < D; d++) {
       *(temp_x+d)=*(x+n+d*N)/ sp;
      }

      for (m=0; m < M; m++) {
          *(P1+m)+=((*(P+m)/ sp) **(prb+n));

          for (d=0; d < D; d++) {
          *(Px+m+d*M)+= (*(temp_x+d)**(P+m)**(prb+n));
          }

      }

   *E +=  -log(sp);     
  }
  *E +=D*N*log(*sigma2)/2;


  free((void*)P);
  free((void*)temp_x);

  return;
}

Here is my attempt at parallelizing it:

#include <cuda.h>
#include <cuda_runtime.h>
#include <device_launch_parameters.h>
#include <thrust/device_ptr.h>
#include <thrust/reduce.h>

/*headers*/
void cpd_comp(
    float * x,        //Points to register      [N*D]
    float * y,        //Points to be registered [M*D]
    float * prb,      //Vector of probabilities [N]
    float * sigma2,   //Square of sigma
    float ** P1,       //P1,  output, [M]
    float ** Pt1,      //Pt1, output, [N]
    float ** Px,       //Px,  output, [M*3]
    int N,            //Number of points, i.e. rows, in x
    int M             //Number of points, i.e. rows, in 
    );

__global__ void d_computeP(
    float * P,
    float * P1,
    float * Px,
    float * ProbabilityMatrix,
    float * x,
    float * y,
    float * prb,
    float ksig,
    const int N,
    const int M);

__global__ void d_sumP(
    float * sp,
    float * P1timessp,
    float * Pxtimessp,
    float * P1,
    float * Px,
    const int N,
    const int M);

/*implementations*/

void cpd_comp(
    float * x,        //Points to register      [N*D]
    float * y,        //Points to be registered [M*D]
    float * prb,      //Vector of probabilities [N]
    float * sigma2,   //Scalar
    float ** P1,       //P1,  output, [M]
    float ** Pt1,      //Pt1, output, [N]
    float ** Px,       //Px,  output, [M*3]
    int N,            //Number of points, i.e. rows, in x
    int M             //Number of points, i.e. rows, in y
    ){
    //X is generatedPointPos
    //Y is points

    float
        *P,
        *P1timessp,
        *Pxtimessp,
        ksig = -2.0 * (*sigma2),
        *h_sumofP = new float[N], //sum of P, on host
        *d_sumofP;                //sum of P, on device

    cudaMalloc((void**)&P,        sizeof(float)*M*N);
    cudaMalloc((void**)&P1timessp,sizeof(float)*M*N);
    cudaMalloc((void**)&Pxtimessp,sizeof(float)*M*N*3);
    cudaMalloc((void**)&d_sumofP, sizeof(float)*N);

    cudaMalloc((void**)P1,        sizeof(float)*M);
    cudaMalloc((void**)Px,        sizeof(float)*M*3);
    cudaMalloc((void**)Pt1,       sizeof(float)*N);

    d_computeP<<<dim3(N,M/1024+1),M>1024?1024:M>>>(P,P1timessp,Pxtimessp,NULL,x,y,prb,ksig,N,M);

    for(int n=0; n<N; n++){
        thrust::device_ptr<float>dev_ptr(P);
        h_sumofP[n] = thrust::reduce(dev_ptr+M*n,dev_ptr+M*(n+1),0.0f,thrust::plus<float>());
    }

    cudaMemcpy(d_sumofP,h_sumofP,sizeof(float)*N,cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    d_sumP<<<M/1024+1,M>1024?1024:M>>>(d_sumofP,P1timessp,Pxtimessp,*P1,*Px,N,M);

    cudaMemcpy(*Pt1,prb,sizeof(float)*N,cudaMemcpyDeviceToDevice);

    cudaFree(P);
    cudaFree(P1timessp);
    cudaFree(Pxtimessp);
    cudaFree(d_sumofP);
    delete[]h_sumofP;
}

/*kernels*/

__global__ void d_computeP(
    float * P,
    float * P1,
    float * Px,
    float * ProbabilityMatrix,
    float * x,
    float * y,
    float * prb,
    float ksig,
    const int N,
    const int M){
    //thread configuration: <<<dim3(N,M/1024+1),1024>>>
    int m = threadIdx.x+blockIdx.y*blockDim.x;
    int n = blockIdx.x;
    if(m>=M || n>=N) return;

    float 
        x1 = x[3*n],
        x2 = x[3*n+1],
        x3 = x[3*n+2],
        diff1 = x1 - y[3*m],
        diff2 = x2 - y[3*m+1],
        diff3 = x3 - y[3*m+2],
        razn = diff1*diff1+diff2*diff2+diff3*diff3,

        Pm = __expf(razn/ksig), //fast exponentiation
        prbn = prb[n];

    P[M*n+m] = Pm; 

    __syncthreads();

    P1[N*m+n] = Pm*prbn;
    Px[3*(N*m+n)+0] = x1*Pm*prbn;
    Px[3*(N*m+n)+1] = x2*Pm*prbn;
    Px[3*(N*m+n)+2] = x3*Pm*prbn;
}

__global__ void d_sumP(
    float * sp,
    float * P1timessp,
    float * Pxtimessp,
    float * P1,
    float * Px,
    const int N,
    const int M){
    //computes P1 and Px
    //thread configuration: <<<M/1024+1,1024>>>
    int m = threadIdx.x+blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
    if(m>=M) return;
    float 
        P1m = 0,
        Pxm1 = 0,
        Pxm2 = 0,
        Pxm3 = 0;
    for(int n=0; n<N; n++){
        float spn = 1/sp[n];
        P1m += P1timessp[N*m+n]*spn;
        Pxm1 += Pxtimessp[3*(N*m+n)+0]*spn;
        Pxm2 += Pxtimessp[3*(N*m+n)+1]*spn;
        Pxm3 += Pxtimessp[3*(N*m+n)+2]*spn;
    }

    P1[m] = P1m;
    Px[3*m+0] = Pxm1;
    Px[3*m+1] = Pxm2;
    Px[3*m+2] = Pxm3;

}

However, to my horror, it runs much, much slower than the original version. How do I make it run faster? Please explain things thoroughly since I am very new to CUDA and parallel programming and have no experience in algorithms.

Do note that the c version has column-major ordering and the CUDA version has row-major. I have done several tests to make sure that the result is correct. It's just extremely slow and takes up a LOT of memory.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

EDIT: More information: N and M are on the order of a few thousand (say, 300-3000) and D is always 3. The CUDA version expects arrays to be device memory, except for variables prefixed with h_.

share|improve this question
    
What computation does this code implement? –  Jared Hoberock Oct 25 '11 at 22:09
    
Can you post some indicative values of M,N and D? –  talonmies Oct 26 '11 at 6:30
    
M and N are on the order of a few thousand, and D is 3. The computation this code implements is used to deal with point clouds, but I'm not too sure what the name of this technique is (or if it even has one). –  Daniel Oct 26 '11 at 6:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Before trying any CUDA-specific optimizations, profile your code to see where time is being spent.

Try and arrange your array reads/writes so that each CUDA thread uses a strided access pattern. For example, currently you have

int m = threadIdx.x+blockIdx.y*blockDim.x;
int n = blockIdx.x;
if(m>=M || n>=N) return;

diff1 = x1 - y[3*m],
diff2 = x2 - y[3*m+1],
diff3 = x3 - y[3*m+2],

So thread 1 will read from y[0],y[1],y[2] etc. Instead, rearrange your data so that thread 1 reads from y[0],y[M],y[2*M] and thread 2 reads from y[1],y[M+1],y[2*M+1] etc. You should follow this access pattern for other arrays.

Also, you may want to consider whether you can avoid the use of __syncthreads(). I don't quite follow why it's necessary in this algorithm, it might be worth removing it to see if it improves performance ( even if it produces incorrect results ).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Is there a way to coalesce memory accesses without changing all my data from row-major to column-major format? There's months of work put into code that crucially depends on this and I don't think I can rearrange all my data. I removed the __syncthreads() and it works fine, although I can't detect any difference in speed. Also, the Nvidia Compute Visual Profiler says that the second kernel d_sumP takes 4-5 times as much time as the first kernel, d_computeP. –  Daniel Oct 26 '11 at 0:14
1  
I would strongly advise investigating transposing the arrays you use in the d_sumP kernel. You can do this programmatically by using the transpose kernels available in the NVIDIA SDK, you may well find that the cost of computing the transpose is outweighed by the gain in memory performance. That said, it is possible to achieve memory coalescing using shared memory if you can't achieve this any other way. You should be able to find info on this technique on the web. –  Andrew Marshall Oct 26 '11 at 9:17
    
I managed to coalesce some of the memory accesses! in d_computeP I replaced Px[3*(N*m+n)+0] = x1*Pm*prbn; with Px[m+M*(n+N*0)] = x1*Pm*prbn; and in d_sumP I replaced Pxm1 += Pxtimessp[3*(N*m+n)+0]*spn; with Pxm1 += Pxtimessp[m+M*(n+N*0)] *spn; (and of course for the other two, since these statements come in threes). I also did the same thing for P1. The code now runs at least 15% faster! I will look into coalescing the rest of the memory accesses later today. –  Daniel Oct 26 '11 at 10:56

The key to good CUDA performance is almost always to make as near to optimal memory access as possible. Your memory access pattern looks very similar to matrix multiplication. I would start with a good CUDA matrix multiplication implementation, being sure to understand why it's implemented the way it is, and then modify that to suit your needs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.