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I have 3 tables where 2 of them are related to the third one through a foreign key. I would like to run a query like:

SELECT * 
FROM template AS t 
LEFT JOIN web_page_content AS wpc ON wpc.template_id = t.id

...and still be able to get the common id's in header and template.

CREATE TABLE template 
(
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL, 
  uri VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,    
  UNIQUE INDEX template_idx (uri), PRIMARY KEY(id)
) ENGINE = InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE web_page_content 
(
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL, 
  template_id INT NOT NULL, 
  content VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL, 
  PRIMARY KEY(id)
) ENGINE = InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE header 
(
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL, 
  template_id INT NOT NULL, 
  content VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL, 
  PRIMARY KEY(id)
) ENGINE = InnoDB;

ALTER TABLE web_page_content 
ADD CONSTRAINT FK_95E4B6E5627579FF FOREIGN KEY (template_id) 
    REFERENCES template(id) ON DELETE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE header 
ADD CONSTRAINT FK_95E3B5E5627579FF FOREIGN KEY (template_id) 
    REFERENCES template(id) ON DELETE CASCADE;  

INSERT INTO `template` (`id`, `uri`) VALUES (NULL, 'my_dir/my_file_0'), (NULL, 'my_dir/my_file_1');
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1  
Not clear on what you are asking, please provide sample data and desired output. –  RedFilter Oct 25 '11 at 14:01
    
"still be able to get the common id's in header and template." With what was provided, this statement doesn't make sense. Need to give more details about what you want to achieve. –  Jamie F Oct 25 '11 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

Is this what you are looking for?

select 
      t.ID,
      t.uri,
      h.ID as HeaderID,
      h.Content as HeaderContent,
      wpc.id as WebPageID,
      wpc.Content as WebContent
   from
      template t
         left join header h
            on t.id = h.template_id
         left join web_page_content wpc
            on t.id = wpc.template_id

-- EDIT --

To clarify sub-selects vs join per comment/feedback.

In this case, you have the capacity to do a direct join from one table to another in a 1:1 ratio by the template ID. The engine finds matches directly on the indexes to then pull the data. Its almost like the engine is implicitly doing a (select / from / where ) on the key ID for you. I don't understand the whole under-the-hood of HOW it does it, it just does it well. By doing a sub-select, you are forcing the engine to explicitly run the query for every record in template table per ID... Say you have 20 templates, and 1000 web content pages. By doing a sub-select (such as where EXISTS) would in effect run the select/from query 1000 times explicitly per ID matched.

With respect to a Cartesian, if you just listed the "From" tables without a join condition, you get a result set that is as many records form table "A" TIMES as many in table "B".. so if you did a simple

select
     t.*,
     wpc.*
   from
      template t,
      web_page_content wpc
   order by...

WITHOUT a WHERE (joining them), or explicit JOIN, and the above record counts sample... you would end up with 20,000 records in the result set.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! Currently that's what i'm doing but i would like to know if is it posible to accomplish the same result with a single left join. Maybe with a subselect? –  user873561 Oct 25 '11 at 14:31
    
@user873561, subselects will kill you on performance, especially on such a direct 1:1 relationship of the keys. You need to have some sort of join (or subselect) to prevent a Cartesian result. In this case, stick with your explicit joins. –  DRapp Oct 25 '11 at 14:35
    
Ok, thanks! But Why don't recommend subselects and then say : You need to have some sort of join (or subselect) to prevent a Cartesian result. Can you explain? –  user873561 Oct 25 '11 at 16:26
    
@user873561, clarified (hopefully) for you in the answer. –  DRapp Oct 25 '11 at 16:59

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