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I have a method that checks all of the combinations of 5 different conditions with 32 if-else statements (think of the truth table). The 5 different letters represent methods that each run their own regular expressions on a string, and return a boolean indicating whether or not the string matches the regex. For example:

if(A,B,C,D,E){

}else if(A,B,C,D,!E){

}else if(A,B,C,!D,!E){

}...etc,etc.

However, it is really affecting the performance of my application (sorry, I can't go into too many details). Can anyone recommend a better way to handle such logic?

Each method using a regular expression looks like this:

String re1 = "regex here";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile(re1, Pattern.DOTALL);
Matcher m = p.matcher(value);
return m.find();

Thanks!

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1  
It would help if you'd show us something other than pseudo-code... for example, do you actually evaluate all the conditions each time, or do you evaluate them once and only check the combinations? –  Jon Skeet Oct 25 '11 at 15:10
    
I added how I handle the regex for each method, does that help? –  littleK Oct 25 '11 at 15:14
2  
I bet A, B, C... are all functions that they significant file to evaluate... keep the result in local booleans. Edit (for the edit), so you evaulate regexp (that are slow to boot each time/ multiple times) –  bestsss Oct 25 '11 at 15:14
    
@littleK: Not really - because your if code is still not valid Java... –  Jon Skeet Oct 25 '11 at 15:17
    
Are you able to share the Pattern instance among the methods? –  tjg184 Oct 25 '11 at 15:19

10 Answers 10

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can try

boolean a,b,c,d,e;
int combination = (a?16:0) + (b?8:0) + (c?4:0) + (d?2:0) + (e?1:0);
switch(combination) {
   case 0:
        break;
   // through to
   case 31:
        break;
}
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+1 I like this one! clever, clear and simple! –  Eng.Fouad Oct 25 '11 at 15:19
    
This solution worked great for me, and really improved the performance. I should have realized my design was poor from the beginning! Thanks again. –  littleK Oct 25 '11 at 16:44
    
A heads-up: natively, this is still a series of "if / else" statements. It ends up being faster because the compiler will optimize it into a "jump table". See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switch_statement#Compilation and the related links ("branch table") to understand a little bit more about how a switch statement can be done in constant time. –  Jeff Ferland Oct 25 '11 at 16:46
    
@JeffFerland 'natively this is still a series of "if/else" statements is meaningless. "Natively", if that means anything, is what it compiles to, which as you go on to say correctly is a branch table. –  EJP Oct 25 '11 at 22:28
    
@EJP with no compiler optimization as when using something that isn't an integer / enum, or if the compiler just doesn't like you, it will be a series of tests rather than jumps. –  Jeff Ferland Oct 25 '11 at 22:36

represent each condition as a bit flag, test each condition once, and set the relevant flag in a single int. then switch on the int value.

int result = 0;
if(A) {
  result |= 1;
}
if(B) {
  result |= 2;
}
// ...

switch(result) {
  case 0: // (!A,!B,!C,!D,!E)
  case 1: // (A,!B,!C,!D,!E)
  // ...
}
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Without knowing more details, it might be helpful to arrange the if statements in such a way that the ones which do the "heavy" lifting are executed last. This is making the assumption that the other conditionals will be true thereby avoiding the "heavy" lifting ones all together. In short, take advantage of short-circuits if possible.

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I do plan to use your suggestion. I'll be interested to see what kind of performance gain I can see. Still, I think I'll need to do more. –  littleK Oct 25 '11 at 15:17

All the above answers are wrong, because the correct answer to an optimisation question is: Measure! Use a profiler to measure where your code is spending its time.

Having said that, I'd be prepared to bet that the biggest win is avoiding compiling the regexes more than once each. And after that, as others suggested, only evaluate each condition once and store the results in boolean variables. So thait84 has the best answer.

I'm also prepared to bet jtahlborn and Peter Lawrey's and Salvatore Previti suggestions (essentially the same), clever though they are, will get you negligible additional benefit, unless you're running on a 6502...

(This answer reads like I'm full of it, so in the interests of full disclosure I should mention that I'm actually hopeless at optimisation. But measuring still is the right answer.)

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1  
"All the above answers are wrong, because the correct answer to an optimisation question is: Measure!" You could apply that to anything. I'd say it's not applicable when the person asking the question is looking for another method to measure... –  Jeff Ferland Oct 25 '11 at 16:10
    
What, you'd say it's not applicable to measure a performance problem before trying to correct it? Are you sure? –  Andrew Spencer Oct 27 '11 at 15:29
    
On reflection, the OP did explicitly ask for improvements to his code, and I didn't answer that. Maybe I should have just commented his question. –  Andrew Spencer Oct 27 '11 at 15:34

Run the regex once for each string and store the results in to booleans and just do the if / else on the booleans instead of running the regex multiple times. Also, if you can, try to re-use a pre-compiled version of your regex and re-use this.

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One possible solution: use a switch creating a binary value.

int value = (a ? 1 : 0) | (b ? 2 : 0) | (c ? 4 : 0) | (d ? 8 : 0) | (e ? 16 : 0);

switch (value)
{
    case 0:
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3:
    case 4:
    ...
    case 31:
}

If you can avoid the switch and use an array it would be faster.

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I have a solution with EnumSet. However it's too verbose and I guess I prefer @Peter Lawrey's solution.

In Effective Java by Bloch it's recommended to use EnumSet over bit fields, but I would make an exception here. Nonetheless I posted my solution because it could be useful for someone with a slightly different problem.

import java.util.EnumSet;

public enum MatchingRegex {
  Tall, Blue, Hairy;

  public static EnumSet<MatchingRegex> findValidConditions(String stringToMatch) {
     EnumSet<MatchingRegex> validConditions = EnumSet.noneOf(MatchingRegex.class);
     if (... check regex stringToMatch for Tall)
       validConditions.add(Tall);
     if (... check regex stringToMatch for Blue)
       validConditions.add(Blue);
     if (... check regex stringToMatch for Hairy)
       validConditions.add(Hairy);
     return validConditions;         
  }
}

and you use it like this:

Set<MatchingRegex> validConditions = MatchingRegex.findValidConditions(stringToMatch);

if (validConditions.equals(EnumSet.of(MatchingRegex.Tall, MathchingRegex.Blue, MatchingRegex.Hairy))
   ...
else if (validConditions.equals(EnumSet.of(MatchingRegex.Tall, MathchingRegex.Blue))
   ...
else if ... all 8 conditions like this

But it would be more efficient like this:

if (validConditions.contains(MatchingRegex.Tall)) {
  if (validConditions.contains(MatchingRegex.Blue)) {
     if (validConditions.contains(MatchingRegex.Hairy)) 
        ... // tall blue hairy
     else
        ... // tall blue (not hairy)
  } else {
     if (validConditions.contains(MatchingRegex.Hairy)) 
        ... // tall (not blue) hairy
     else
        ... // tall (not blue) (not hairy)
} else {
      ... remaining 4 conditions
}
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+1 I think this solution is easier to understand and modify(without making a mistake) –  IAdapter Oct 26 '11 at 12:22

You could also adapt your if/else to a switch/case (which I understand is faster)

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1  
not really. the problem is in the conditions themselves. –  bestsss Oct 25 '11 at 15:13

pre-generating A,B,C,D and E as booleans rather than evaluating them in if conditions blocks would provide both readability and performance. If you're also concerned about performance the different cases, you may organise them as a tree or combine them into a single integer (X = (A?1:0)|(B?2:0)|...|(E?16:0)) that you'd use in a switch.

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Maybe partition it into layers, like so:

if(A) {
    if(B) {
        //... the rest
    } else {
        //... the rest
    }
} else {
    if(B) {
        //... the rest
    } else {
        //... the rest
    }
}

Still, feels like there must be a better way to do this.

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